4 Tips for Training Remote Workers

Many organisations currently face the challenge of training an increasingly remote workforce. Whereas training itself can sometimes be a challenge, having your employees not present at the office brings about its own peculiarities. While instructor-led training is often an option, it’s not necessarily feasible in the case of the remote staff. Therefore, we’ll use this post to focus on digital learning and the possibilities and challenges of it. Let’s take a look at 4 ways of making training remote workers more effective.

Using asynchronous learning for training remote workers

When people are working remotely, it’s often from home or a personal space. One of the main value propositions of remote working being the flexibility in time management, you shouldn’t take away from that with your digital learning either. Therefore, asynchronous learning can often be the better option. Employees can progress at their own pace and as they see fit.

However, using asynchronous learning in training remote workers doesn’t mean that you should do away with instructors. In fact, having instructors for different modules and courses can be beneficial. It’s just that the instructor’s role in such setting is slightly different. Instead of being at the centre stage, the instructor becomes more of a facilitator and a support resource. They are there to guide the engagement, while still respecting each learners’ own time management and progress.

Communicating well and often is key

Another major factor in successfully training remote workers is communication. In fact, remote learners often need much more communication than those who learn e.g. in a face-to-face setting. On one hand, this is to mitigate some of the feeling of social isolation. On the other hand, it’s to make the goals of the learning and ways of achieving them absolutely crystal clear.

Therefore, it’s advisable to build in more frequent communication touch points into this type of digital learning. For instance, you can consider setting up email flows for weekly recaps, new content alerts, hot topics etc. Also, if you have an instructor – or a facilitator – they should be proactive in engaging and providing value to the users actively. This can take the form of e.g. sharing additional resources and new updates, as well as opening discussions about various topics.

Peer-to-peer learning

While having an instructor for your online course can help to mitigate social isolation, a more social learning approach can be even better. Peer-to-peer learning can be a great way of enabling your remote staff to work together and also contribute to the learning of each other. In training remote workers, peer learning can bring about some much needed group dynamic. Since people are working remotely, it’s likely that they’re already using a lot of tools that enable it.

Even if you don’t employ such social learning platforms, having employees take part in the “content generation” process can still be very helpful. Especially in times when organisations have to digitalise content rapidly, as is currently the case, having more people contributing naturally helps. User-generated content can provide a valuable way of streamlining the digitalisation process.

Creating social presence

Like mentioned previously, the social aspect of learning becomes incredibly important in the case of remote workers. Therefore, it’s also important to create opportunities for social presence – the feeling of being a part of something. For instance, whereas digital learning is often an individual effort, why not make it a group one. Setting up learning groups can on one hand promote accountability, but also create some of that social needed social interaction.

On the learning design front, make sure to build in a lot of opportunities for reflection. Group reflection – even better. Having people sharing their own experiences and engaging in discussions is a major building block to unity as an organisation. To up the engagement even further, collaborative learning experiences where teams strive together for a goal might be even more effective.

Final words

Organisations are increasingly gravitating towards flexible and location-independent working and this has an effect on learning too. As remote working may just become the new norm at least for the time being, it’s important that we re-evaluate our L&D efforts to ensure training remote workers goes smoothly. If you need help in crafting engaging digital learning experiences for a remote workforce, don’t hesitate to reach out. We’re happy to provide our support.