Explainer Animations for Learning – Engage with Visuals

Explainer Animations for Learning

Explainer Animations for Learning – Engaging with Visuals

The preferred ways of presenting information have become increasingly multi-faceted over the last few years. In the digital and mobile era, conventional information format like documents, slide decks and presentations have lost their way. Information today has to be quick and convenient to access, as well as increasingly visual. Visualised information – especially in the format of videos – provides learners a convenient medium getting to the right facts and figures at the point of need. It’s also helpful for opening up different concepts and frameworks. Hence, we’ll look at a few examples and use cases for explainer animations in learning.

What can you use explainer animations for in learning?

In general, we consider explainer animations to work well conveying the following kinds of information:

  1. Numerical information
  2. Statistics
  3. Business Cases
  4. Persuasive Messages

To better illustrate things, take a look at this sample of an explainer animation explaining the concept of flipped learning.

Why do explainer animations make a difference?

As we are constantly fighting for our learners’ attention, video-based content generally provides a good alternative for increased engagement. Furthermore, using explainer animations or videos helps you to focus on the key messages, stripping away unnecessary information and all the “nice-to-know”. This helps to avoid cognitive overload on the learners’ part, which in turn increases learning retention. Furthermore, you are also engaging two new groups of people with spatial/visual and aural/musical learning styles. Overall, the time required to build animations such as this one is not that huge, hence justifying the investment. In terms of software needed, Vyond provides a great tool for creating all types of animations.

If you need help in delivering better learning with explainer animations and videos, we can help. Just contact us. Furthermore, if you’d like to create your own, take a look at Vyond

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Leveraging Learning Content Analytics for Better Learning Experiences

Learning content analytics cover

Leveraging Learning Content Analytics for Better Learning Experiences

 

We published this article first on eLearning Industry, the largest online community of eLearning professionals. You may find the original article here

An area where Learning and Development professionals could learn a lot from, e.g. marketing experts, is content analytics. Whereas marketing has embraced the need to constantly iterate and redevelop content based on real-time campaign analytics, learning professionals tend to take the easier route. Once an eLearning activity is produced and published, it’s easy to just leave it there and be done with it. But the work is really only at its midway. How do you find out if the content resonated with the audience or not? If it didn’t, how do you figure out what are the problem areas with the content? This is where learning content analytics come in handy.

Example Of Learning Content Analytics On A Training Video

When analysing the effectiveness of eLearning content, you should pay attention to what kind of metrics you are tracking. For instance, in the case of a training video, traditional metrics like how many times the video was opened don’t necessarily carry a lot of value. Instead, we should be looking at the content consumption behaviour on a wider scale, throughout the content and the learning journey. Let’s take a look at an analytical view of a training video.

Learning content analytics on training video
With learning content analytics, you can easily capture where your learners lose interest and drop off.

In this example, you can see the users’ behaviour at various stages of the training video. As usual, you see a slump immediately in the beginning, followed by another bigger slump later on. We’ve coloured the 2 main points of interest to break them down.

1. Initial Attrition

You are always bound to lose some learners in the beginning due to a plethora of reasons. However, if you constantly see big drops starting from 0 seconds, you might want to double-check, e.g. the loading times of the content, to make sure your learners are not quitting because of inability to access the material in a timely manner.

2. Learning Content Engagement Failure

Going further in the video, we see another big slump where we lose around 40% of the remaining learners in just 30 seconds. Clearly, this represents a learning engagement failure. Something is not right there. Learners are likely dropping off because the content is not engaging, relevant or presented in an appealing way.

How Should I Incorporate Content Analytics In The eLearning Development Process?

The above-mentioned video analytics is just a single example of how you can use content analytics to support your learning. Ideally, you should be running these kind of analytics across all your learning content. xAPI tracking capabilities give a lot of possibilities in this regard. Once you’re collecting the data and running the analytics, this is how you could build the use of analytics into your eLearning development process:

  1. Develop an initial version of eLearning materials
  2. Roll it out to a test group of learners, monitor the analytics
  3. Identify potential learning engagement failures and re-iterate content accordingly
  4. Mass roll-out to a wider audience
  5. Revisit the content analytics at regular milestones (e.g. when a new group of learners is assigned the content) to ensure continued relevance and engagement

This type of approach helps to ensure that the learning activities you provide and invest money in, perform at their best at all times.

How Can I Use Learning Content Analytics To Provide Better Learning Experiences?

By now, you’ve surely developed many use cases for content analytics. To summarise, here’s how you could provide a better learning experience through data-driven insights:

1. Identify The Types Of Content Your Learners Like

In the case of videos, you could benchmark the performance of different types of videos (e.g. talking heads, animations, storytelling videos) against each other and see what type of content keeps your learners engaged the best.

2. Develop Engaging Content

With the power of analytics, you’ll be able to develop better learning. You are able to find out immediately what works and what doesn’t. No need to run extensive surveys. The behavior of the learners is the best feedback.

3. Personalise Learning Experiences

You can naturally run analytics for individuals and defined groups, in addition to the whole mass of learners. This helps you personalise the learning experiences according to e.g. skill levels, seniority, experience, previous learning history, etc.

All in all, learning content analytics provide a powerful tool for increased transparency and visibility into the performance of your eLearning. As learning moves to more in-demand and just-in-time, they help to ensure that you’re delivering the right content to the right audience.

Are you interested in developing more analytical, data-driven approaches to your L&D? Or want to know more about different content analytics possibilities? Just drop us a note, and we’ll get back to you. 

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Curating Interactive Microlearning Videos – Leveraging Free Resources

Curate Microlearning videos

Curating Interactive Microlearning Videos – Leveraging Free Resources

“Video is the king of content” is a statement that holds true especially well today. Digital and mobile behaviour analytics indicate that video is the most engaging format of content. Whether is personal or professional, weekends or office hours, our tendency to consume knowledge snacks in bite-sized video format is ever growing. This is why microlearning, especially interactive microlearning videos, fare so well in engaging the learners. However, organisations often see videos as an expensive format to produce (they’re not!), which hinders adoption. This line of thought is failing to see the forest from the trees. There are already massive libraries of free video content available to everyone with internet, so why not take advantage of those? In this article, we look at leveraging free Youtube videos in curating interactive microlearning videos.

What is curation and why is it important?

Content curation is the process of selecting and refining the content to suit the learning objectives. The amount of content in services like Youtube becomes a problem when trying to integrate learning into the flow of work. Simply put, employees don’t have the time to go through several videos in trying to find the one that fits their needs. Hence, the most basic level of curation – identifying the suitable content – is an important task for the L&D team. From thereon, you can go further in incorporating knowledge checks, navigation and other additional elements into the video. Check out the example below.

(this example is a very primitive one, based on the video on our front page, but you’ll get the point!)

What’s the benefit of curating interactive microlearning videos like this?

The benefit of refining the content with embedded comes in the form of increased engagement and content performance. There’s quite a number of things that you can do with the videos:

  • Linking to other content – this helps your learners to find solutions to their problems with other supporting resources
  • Video navigations – these help your learners to get to the right information faster – no more time wasted in watching videos without getting the answers needed. Good navigation is an absolute must for longer videos.
  • Knowledge checks – these provide a good way to engage the learners within the video and test their learning. At the most basic, it can be to check whether the concept was understood. At a more refined level, you can prompt for more qualitative user input and feedback.

Arguably, the whole corporate learning sphere is moving to a more performance- and learner-centric approach. More ‘Pull’, less ‘Push’. More performance support, less assigned compulsory learning. These types of interactive microlearning videos provide a great way of catering to that requirement. And by leveraging on free resources, you can keep the costs down while having access to loads of good content.

Would you like to find out more about curating microlearning videos such as this one? Or would you like to learn more about using free resources in your learning mix? We’ll help you, just contact us here

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Training Videos – 5 Tips to Make them Effective

Training videos

Making Effective Training Videos – 5 Tips to Improve Results

Learning and training has gone largely digital for the past years, thanks to the added flexibility and ability to learn on demand. With services like Youtube, videos have become one of the most popular format of consuming content. For training purposes, videos have a lot to offer. Whereas the dynamic and engagement is better than that of static, text-based materials, videos can do a lot more. Videos help to visualise, illustrate and capture real-life scenarios. However, there are a few things to keep in mind when using videos for training. Hence, here are 5 tips on making effective training videos.

1. Training videos need to be short

The first rule of training videos is “less is more” – referring to both content and duration. Sure, it might seem fun to capture a senior executive speaking to the camera in feature-film lengths, but it serves absolutely no purpose. Statistically, people only watch and focus on videos for minutes. Hence, the optimal video duration should be between 1-7 minutes. This ensures the least amount of learning attrition and helps to focus on the key messages. If you think you have too much content for seven minutes, you should probably get familiar with microlearning and its benefits.

2. You need to capture the learners’ attention

Similar to marketing videos, it is equally important to capture your audience’s attention with training videos. Ideally, you should establish the importance of the topic at hand in the first 15 seconds. Simultaneously, you should also introduce the contents of the video. If your video is divided into multiple settings, try giving a sneak peek of what’s coming in the beginning. This way, you help the learners to understand the benefits of the training video and align their expectations on what’s to come.

3. Audio matters the most in training videos

Nowadays, all of us are able to produce good quality videos. The past few generation of smart phones have been capable of shooting videos at such picture quality that the layman can no longer notice the difference.  Hence, picture quality has become irrelevant. Rather, it’s audio quality that makes or break the training video. If you’re doing narrated videos or voice-overs, make sure you edit out all the echoing. A good microphone in an acoustic studio helps a lot, but you can do a lot just with a computer. The first thing we generally pay attention to in the video are the sounds. If the voice-overs sound bad or sounds are low-quality, we are prompted to make a fast exit.

4. Don’t clog the video with too much effects

Sometimes, we should remember that we do training videos for training and not to showcase our editing room capabilities. The message and the content are the key, and they should be the focus point of the learner’s attention. If we use too many effects, no matter how nice they may be, we take away from that focus. After all, we don’t want our learners’ paying attention to the scene cuts, animations and visual tricks instead of the actual training. Hence, you should pick 1-3 low-key effects and use them consistently. You’ll end up with a quality video with good cuts, while ensuring your learners’ minds are where they’re supposed to.

5. Make your training videos interactive

Even though videos are much more dynamic than traditional text based content, they still lack a degree of interactivity. Instead of guessing if the learners’ are learning, why don’t you prompt them with questions inside the video? Instead of assigning dreaded formal testing, why don’t you test the skills development directly in the videos? By enabling different types of interactivity, you’ll get better engagement benefiting both sides. Find out more about interactive videos here.

Are you using videos for training and having problems with learning engagement? We are happy to help, just contact us here. Also, you should check out learning animations, and how they may help you take your video based training to a new level.

 

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