Digital Coaching – Finding Value-add in a Traditional Space

Digital coaching

Digital Coaching – Finding Value-add in a Traditional Space

The traditional industry of business- and executive coaching is slowly embarking on a journey of change. Digitalisation is taking on another line of profession and causing a stir. While a lot of coaches believe strongly in the power of face-to-face (and don’t get us wrong, we do too!), unfortunately many seem to have totally neglected the changes in the environment around them. While corporations are increasingly careful in evaluating the value-add their vendors provide, they’re also looking to coach more and more people. Taking these two factors – namely the need to demonstrate results and scale up while keeping the offering affordable – into consideration, there could be opportunities for digital approaches. Here are some value-add cases we see for digital coaching.

Digital helps coaches to focus on what matters

Let’s get the easy ones out of the way, shall we? Like a lot of other digital technology, digital tools can also help coaches to reduce non-productive activities. Even in coaching, there’s a fair bit of administrative work involved. Maintaining records, scheduling sessions and producing reports don’t seem exactly high-value to a coach. However, that work needs to be done also.

Digital coaching tools can help coaches keep records accurate, accessible and transparent. A lot of the administrative workflows can be automated, enabling the coach to spend more time with the clients. Furthermore, the ability to produce meaningful reports on all things with a single click is something that you cannot achieve with traditional means. Good, clear and reliable reporting on progress and development will help the coach to demonstrate value to the client.

Delivering better interactions through digital coaching

Interactivity is a key part to the coaching equation. Not only do the clients expect you to be there for them at all times, but it’s likely very difficult to drive behavioural change “from a distance”. Overall, there seems to be value in more frequent and less formal coaching interactions. Digital tools can help to lower the barriers and enable constant access. Constant interactions between the coach and the client also enable a shift of focus from scenarios to real-world problem solving. As a learning experience, the latter tends to be a lot more powerful. Furthermore, this type of digital coaching also provides a new learning on-demand medium. The clients can reach out for information at their point of need and that’s when they’re at their most receptive.

On the other hand, why even limit the power of interactions to the coach-client relationship? While individual coaching is perhaps the most effective form of it, that’s not to say there’s no power in a group. As adults we learn through experiences and reflection – both our own and those of others. Therefore, interacting with one’s peers within a coaching group can provide a great learning opportunity on its own. And to facilitate these kinds of digital information exchanges and interactions today, there are simply no better tools than digital platforms.

Digital coaching provides an improved experience

In the end, it all really comes down to the coaching experience. Digital technologies have the power to facilitate that experience in a way that traditional approaches cannot. Also, the focus should be on the experience, rather than on producing a cheap version of something. Ultimately, there should be value-add to find for everyone, whether one’s coaching e.g. senior executives or sales agents. A simultaneous improvement in scalability, accessibility and user experience sounds like something the corporate clients might appreciate.

Of course, the opportunities don’t end there. While you’re at it, why not consider combining learning activities with group- and personalised coaching. Providing the clients with resources to support behavioural change after formal learning activities (think of performance support) is a potential high value-add area in terms of learning results. So, take a good look at your own offering and start considering whether you could deliver more value by adding some digital means to the mix.

If you’re looking to explore digital opportunities in coaching, ILT or learning overall, we can help you develop a great offering. Just contact us to get started.

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How to Support Employee Onboarding with Digital Feedback Tools?

How to Support Employee Onboarding with Digital Feedback Tools

Supporting Employee Onboarding with Digital Feedback Tools

As far as learning experiences go, employee onboarding is a crucial one. At it’s best, a great onboarding process helps to form a strong relationship with the employee. At its worst however, it can just about drive them out. Naturally, organisations across the board are looking to streamline their onboarding processes – without sacrificing quality. In this regard, digital onboarding tools and methods can help a lot. However, unfortunately many organisations resort to just dumping information using the digital tools, rather than figuring out how to actually help the new hires. To really help the new hires up to speed faster, flow of information and feedback is critical. Thus, here are a few tips on using digital feedback tools to support employee onboarding.

The common problems in employee onboarding

Generally, we could classify the mistakes in onboarding to two categories: learning and non-learning. Learning mistakes, for instance, include spending too much time on formal training, forcing cognitive overload and a lack learning support or personalised learning. Often, onboarding is a highly standardised set of activities Non-learning mistakes, on the other hand, can include things like company phones or computers not delivered on first day of work, not receiving employee credentials and wasting time on non-working activities due to all the above. It’s not uncommon to hear horror stories where new employees spend days without the necessary equipment to do their jobs!

So, let’s look at supporting the two kinds of problems with some digital feedback tools.

Using digital feedback to support learning activities

Whenever you join a new company, there’s a lot to learn. As all individuals are different, organisations face a challenge of being aware and responding to all the individual learning needs arising throughout the the first few months. What could be the best way to perform a better training needs analysis on the new hires? Why don’t you ask them directly?

Digital feedback tools provide a great way of supporting employee onboarding and the learning activities involved. For every learning activity, you should collect feedback. In addition to impressions and suggestions for improvement, you can inquire whether the new joiners think they have received an adequate amount of training to do their jobs properly. If someone hasn’t, maybe you should have a personal discussion to solve the issue. If multiple people indicate they feel the need for more training, maybe you have to look in the mirror and figure out what’s wrong with your learning activities! And this is no rocket science. Simple likert scales work very well, as long as the data is real-time and there’s someone on the other end keeping an eye on the responses. As everything is digital, it’s also highly scalable and seamless to use.

Using digital feedback tools to support non-learning activities

While learning plays an important part in supporting employee onboarding, it’s the practical things that you should get right first. It’s rather easy to implement a similar logic as before to non-learning activities. For instance, you could construct a digital check-list for all the administrative activity (receive computer, phone, IT system credentials, lunch coupons, coffee mug etc.). At the end of day one, every employee would fill out a feedback form confirming that all of the above have been taken care of. If not, you’ll know right away and are able fix it. Once all the administrative hurdle is streamlined, you’ll find that your employee become productive much faster.

Furthermore, you can use digital feedback to collect some additional insights as well. In addition to simple receipt notices of equipment, you could poll the employees on their skills on them. “Now that you’ve received the computer, do you need help using it?” This will further help you to provide the new joiners the means to succeed and perhaps even adjust your training or the onboarding process itself. If you never ask, you’ll never improve!

Would you like to support employee onboarding with digital means? Drop us a note, and let’s see if we can help you help your employees.

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How to Support Classroom Training with Digital Tools?

How to support classroom training with digital tools

Using Digital Tools to Support Classroom Training

While digital learning has been growing and improving in quality steadily over the last several decades, classroom training still constitutes the majority of activities for many organisations. While digital learning will capture more and more market share due to the low efficacy and efficiency of classroom training, it’s certainly not going to replace all of it. For some topics, face-to-face is likely to remain the primary mode of instruction for a long time. However, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t support those activities with digital tools. Here are some examples of digital tools to support classroom training.

To make it easier, let’s divide training activities into three based on their sequence: pre-session, in-session and post-session.

Using digital tools for pre-work and activities before classroom training

One of the problem with traditional classroom training is that participants come in unprepared. Furthermore, the trainer often doesn’t know them, their learning history or performance beforehand. This results in lower engagement, lack of personalization and decreased relevance. But proper use of digital tools before the training session can help trainers to make the sessions as effective as possible.

For instance, a good practice is to do some pre-work activities online before the actual session. While not necessarily significant, they help the learners to prepare for the upcoming and adjust mentally. They’ll also be able to think about the topic beforehand and come in with questions and ideas. To collect ideas, expectations and perform more in-depth needs analysis, you can also use digital tools. For instance, online surveys, digital feedback tools and social platforms are a great way of engaging the learners before the session.

What should be the goal of pre-work activities?

Overall, the goal of pre-session activities should be to understand as much about the learner as possible and engage them beforehand. This enables the trainer to provide a much more tailored training experience. Organisations who already utilise learning data to support their decision making should also make the insights available to trainers.

How to use digital tools inside the classroom?

Once inside the classroom, it’s important to use the time for active learning instead of just delivering information. Luckily, there are a multitude of different digital tools to support classroom training activities and to activate the learners. For the purpose of this piece, we are gonna leave powerpoint and other similar presentation software out.

To start out, live polling is a good way to engage people. By asking questions from the audience through their digital devices, there’s less pressure to speak up. Rather, learners can send in their thoughts through their phones – even anonymously if required. The results and input can then be displayed to the group in the form of e.g. automatically generated graphs or word clouds. This provides the learners the ability to understand others’ perceptions of the topic, without the need for extensive classroom discussion, which may be difficult in some cultures.

In addition, you can use digital tools and methods for on-the-spot assessment as well. They are also effective in collecting live feedback and potentially even in doing peer evaluation. While these are some of the more concrete tools, you can also use a variety of digital media. Short training videos, puzzles and small games can be equally good in activating the audience.

How to use digital tools after classroom training?

The challenge with corporate learning is that it’s often too transactional, due to lack of resources and commitment. You can have a great trainer deliver a truly engaging session, but still the forgetting curve is not on your side. Usually, there’s very little follow-up and statistically, you’ll still forget most of the things discussed. To support learning retention and help those experiences carry over to long-term memory, digital tools come in handy.

In addition to the traditional assessment, which is most efficient to do online, you should also provide learning reinforcements. A spaced learning approach, in which the learners are exposed to small bits of content over a period of time to activate their memory tends to work quite well. Different microlearning activities also tend to lend themselves quite well for this type of use. And finally, like in any learning activity, it’s important to keep collecting the feedback for continuous improvement.

Overall, it’s highly beneficial to support classroom training with digital tools. You’ll not only understand your learners better, but you can also improve learning results thanks to the increased engagement. So give it a try!

Do you need help in building the right kind of digital support resources for your classroom training? Our articles on flipped learning and blended learning can provide additional ideas. If you’d like more hands-on assistance, feel free to contact us and we can develop an approach with you.

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Understanding Corporate Learning Technology Needs

Corporate learning technology needs

Understanding Corporate Learning Technology Needs

Whenever organisations start looking into implementing learning technologies, they should carefully examine what is needed. Unfortunately, we often encounter organisations who choose technology based on “best practices” and seemingly for “keeping up with the Joneses”, rather than carefully analysing and understanding their own organisation, employees and stakeholders. To help to clear the clutter, here’s a rundown of the different types of learning technology implementations and what fuels them.

The different types of learning technology implementations

This type classification is based on the concept by Donald H Taylor.

Learning technology implementations can be divided into 4 different types based on the needs, goals and motivations.

  1. Updating organisational infrastructure
  2. Increasing L&D efficiency
  3. Increasing learning effectiveness
  4. Facilitating organisational change

Now, let’s look at all of these in more detail and try to understand some of the underlying corporate learning technology needs.

1. Updating organisational infrastructure

The first type of learning technology implementations focuses on supporting the business as usual. Needs related to e.g. risk management, compliance and formal assessments often result in this type of implementation. While all important goals, the focus is often not learning itself.

2. Increasing L&D efficiency

The second type of implementations focuses on making learning more efficient. In practice, this generally means cost savings, increased scalability, reduced administrative burden and shorter time requirements to roll out learning activities. While most implementations seem to fall into this category, they may not necessarily address the real corporate learning needs or the efficacy of learning processes themselves.

3. Increasing learning effectiveness

The third type of implementations are probably the hardest ones to manage. The real effect of learning on performance is not easily measured by conventional means, making the returns harder to prove. However, a data-driven approach to corporate learning and proper learning analytics help tremendously. The return doesn’t have to be strictly financial either, although understanding the business impact does help a lot. Also, if you can demonstrate impacts on retention or time to competence, you’re more likely to get buy-in.

4. Facilitating organisational change

Finally, the fourth type of implementations is evidently the most impactful one to the organisation. Often, these are cases where organisations use learning to support a cultural change. If you’re struggling to measure learning effectiveness on its own, good luck measuring that in connection to organisational change. As a results, thanks to the sheer difficulty of tangible metrics, these implementations are initiated from the top. However, as the buy-in from the senior management is in place from the beginning, L&D might have a much smoother sailing!

Overall, every organisation has different corporate learning technology needs. Consequently, the implementations and their goals are going to be different as well. With this classification, you’re hopefully able to recognise where you and your project stand and act accordingly.

Are you implementing learning technologies but not achieving success? Or are you planning to but don’t know where to start? We at Learning Crafters can help, just contact us. We primarily manage and facilitate type 3 and 4 implementations, but are open to providing advise on other kinds of projects as well.

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How to Launch Learning Technology Projects Successfully?

How to Launch Learning Technology Projects Successfully

How to Launch Learning Technology Projects Successfully?

Learning technology implementations are quite complex projects, especially on a larger scale. In addition to all the technical and design work that goes into a project, you also need to manage and communicate with multiple stakeholder groups. While all phases of the implementation are important, and good stakeholder communication is imperative in every phase, the launch phase is the one L&D professionals tend to be the most anxious about. To help you in the process, here are some different ways to launch learning technology along with helpful tips.

A ‘Big Bang’ Launch for big projects

The big bang launch – a simultaneous organisation-wide rollout – is perhaps the “traditional” approach to launching learning technology. Before the launch, the implementation team works the technology to perfection. All content shall usually be available from the outset. Essentially, it’s about trying to build the perfect product, and only then launching it.

This type of approach may make sense for large organisation-wide implementations, in which there’s buy-in from the top executives. The big launch creates momentum which is detrimental in bringing all the employees on board.

However, this approach to launching learning technology is also a very high-risk one. There will be a lot of nay-sayers (as people, in general, are against change) who will use any flaws in the product to prove its uselessness. While you’re very unlikely to have a perfect product from the get-go, there are measures you can take to mitigate the risk. Firstly, it’s important to know your stakeholders thoroughly. Secondly, it’s important to ensure accessible and direct channels of feedback and support.

A ‘soft launch’ for learning tech may be more user-centric

Whereas in the big bang approach relies on a ready product to be delivered as-is, the soft launch method takes a bit more risk averse approach. In a soft launch, the learning technology is initially rolled out to a selected user group. When it comes to launching learning technology, organisations may often choose to soft launch the platform to the HR team or a particular department. While the approach is much more low-key, it’s also a lot less risky.

Similar to the big bang approach, communication and feedback are important. In fact, the fundamental idea of a soft launch is to gather user live user feedback, implement changes accordingly and ultimately, build the buy-in for the technology through that collaboration. And to gather feedback effectively, you should ideally get as diverse set of user reviews as possible. Thus, it might make more sense to incorporate users with various roles and functions into the initial soft launch.

How about an incremental launch of learning technology?

A third potential alternative to launch learning technology is the incremental approach. You could view it as a bit similar to launching a beta-version of a product. The initial rollout doesn’t have all the features nor all the content. For learning technology implementations, the incremental progression of features comes somewhat more naturally. As we are using more cloud-based products, the vendors are also updating more frequently. Key features should of course be available from the start, but not giving out a too complex system at the launch might actually make it easier for the users to adopt it.

When it comes to content, the incremental approach requires a bit of careful management. Firstly, the progression and scheduling of content needs to be planned carefully, with the most critical learning activities taking priority. Secondly, you should make sure there’s something for all users. Inviting people to a platform with no content useful to them is a good way of disengaging the user base. Thirdly, you should ensure that the whole launch support a gradual change rather than disrupting existing workflows altogether, as that’s a fundamental ideology behind the incremental approach.

Overall, no matter which method of launching learning technology you choose, communication is the key. Feedback before, throughout and after the launch is important. Moreover, you should strive for a learner-centric approach to the development wherever possible. In the end, that’s the best guarantor of success.

Do you need help or advise in launching new learning technologies in the workplace? We can work with you as an implementation partner, guiding you through the implementation process. Just contact us.

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Learning Technology Implementations – 3 Mistakes to Avoid

Learning technology implementation - 3 pitfalls to avoid

Learning Technology Implementations – 3 Mistakes to Avoid

When it comes to learning technology implementations, a lot can go wrong. If not careful, you might be investing a lot of time and resources into something that ultimately doesn’t work. Sometimes, it might be that the vendor has oversold you and fails to deliver. But equally often it might be due to lacklustre internal preparation for the project. Here are three common pitfalls to avoid when implementing learning technologies in the workplace.

1. Not choosing the right technology

The first step to get right in a learning technology implementation is the technology selection. Unfortunately, it’s also a step where a lot of organisations get it wrong. Sure, the market is a big one (you can choose from more than 5-700 different products) and it may be hard to navigate through the aggressive sales pitches of the vendors and to really understand the capabilities on offer. It’s also very easy to resort to systems that someone in the company has used before, but that type of thinking doesn’t really set you out for the long term.

So, when it comes to learning technology implementations, the first thing to understand is your own organisation. What’s the business problem you’re trying to solve with the technology? Who’s going to be using the solution? How? Once you’ve carefully defined the problem, it’s a lot easier to see the potential solutions among all the rest.

It’s important to get the technology right, but it’s also important to find the right expertise to support the project. Technology vendors may sometimes lack a holistic understanding of the use of learning technology, as they’re solely focused on pushing their own product out there. In such situations, it might make sense to bring in an outside learning consultant. The consultant can provide the much needed expertise in digital learning, which helps to get to actual learning results.

2. Believing in “build it and they will come”

The “build it and they will come” belief is one of the longer standing myths in learning technology implementations. However, the belief that once a system is out there, users will automatically engage with it is just utter nonsense.

In reality, you first of all have to know your users; how the technology can help them, save their time, make them more efficient and so on. Naturally, if you haven’t known this already, you might have ended up with a wrong technology altogether. Secondly, it’s important have engaging, interactive and interesting learning content (here, here and here are some tips for that). Thirdly, getting your employees or users to adopt a new system will take a good amount of internal marketing and communications.

3. Locking yourself into a vendor relationship

As mentioned, a lot of learning implementations fail – and many for reasons not even listed above. If a project fails and you’re not getting the results you want, you should probably look at cooperating with other providers. Thus, the worst disservice you can do to your own organisation is to lock yourself into a vendor relationship. Lengthy, often fixed contracts are obviously what the vendors prefer, and in exchange you may score a discount on the license fees. However, if you want to switch providers after a year of failed efforts but are committed to five years, you’re out of luck.

Thus, we would encourage companies to work with vendors who appreciate flexibility, and that their product might not always be the best. Cloud-based systems and software-as-a-service (SaaS) models are very commonplace nowadays. In fact, if vendors insist on long, fixed contracts, that should perhaps be a sign of caution. As in if the product is as good as they describe, a flexible SaaS solution would be more profitable for them as well.

Overall, there a lot of ways a learning technology implementation can go wrong. Here are some of the usually overlooked ones. Hope they help you in your learning technology projects.

If you think you could use outside expertise in your learning technology implementation, we are happy to help. Our engagements cover both technology selections and digital learning advisory. Just contact us to set up a meeting.

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Should You Do Customer Training – the Whys and Hows

customer training why and how to do it

Should You Do Customer Training – the Whys and Hows

As we discussed last week on our article about extended enterprise learning, the scope of corporate learning is evolving. Training your own employees is no longer enough, as the importance of other stakeholder groups has increased. Interestingly, customers have become a major training recipient for many organisations. While training organisations are naturally accustomed to training their clients, traditional companies may not be. Thus, let’s look at customer training, it’s benefits and how to do it.

The benefits of customer training show on your top line

Everyone who has worked in sales, marketing or business development knows that getting new customers is more expensive than retaining old ones. Thus, customer engagement and retention (the churn rate) has become one of the most looked after sales metrics.

A great customer training program can have multiple positive effects that are likely to contribute to your top line:

  • Increased customer engagement – people and buyers are interacting with you outside the immediate transactional scope
  • Improved customer competency – customers who know how to use your products or services to their full potential are happy customers
  • Increased brand engagement – buyers are nowadays looking for brands they can identify themselves with. Customer training programs give you a channel to communicate your brand and values.
  • Better conversion rates – nowadays many buyers base their decision on the level of support services offered. Training programs are a great medium of customer support, enabling independent and self-directing problem solving.

Overall, there seems to be a lot going for providing learning experiences to ones customers. And don’t just take our word for it – have a look around! Most technology companies and many traditional businesses have such training programs in place. Some have even developed their own separate business models around it.

How should you do customer training?

Naturally, training your customers is a slightly different than training your employees. While the same principles of learning still apply, the primary difference comes in motivation. The reasons why your customers take up on your learning may be quite different from your employees. To make things simpler, we can divide training into two kinds:

1. Customer onboarding and performance support

Whenever someone buys from a product or a service from you, you should strive to get them up to speed fast. Especially with complex products and solutions, developing the main users’ competency is important. Hence, a customer onboarding training might be a worthwhile consideration.

Regardless of the complexity, you should always provide your clients with performance support resources. These can range from training programs to newsletters to online communities and everything in between.

2. Customer training as a branding & sales tool

Whereas onboarding and performance support deal more with customer retention, training can be used in client acquisition too. Many organisations use free online training offerings, e.g. courses, webinars and videos to grow their pipeline. Every touch point is a chance to deliver more information that may lead to a buying decision. In an era of global competition, potential customers are much more likely to remember you after taking your course or attending your webinar.

Likewise, people like to buy from brands they can identify with. Training programs let your organisation to spread its core message and demonstrate its values. Training topics that could enhance your brand image may include e.g. sustainability, self-development and social responsibility.

How does training customers differ from training employees?

Like previously mentioned, the primary difference between employees and customers comes in motivation. Whereas your employees may sit through uninteresting training out of obligation, your customers won’t. Thus, it’s important to offer great user experiences and engaging learning materials. Thankfully, the learning technology space has a lot to offer in that department.

Are you looking to develop a customer training program but not quite sure how to go about it? Feel free to drop us a note, and we’ll do our best to help you.

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Learning Technology Trends for 2019 – What’s Ahead?

Learning Technology Trends for 2019

Learning Technology Trends for 2019 – What’s Ahead? 

During the past few years, we’ve witnessed an unprecedented speed of development in the learning technology space. Likewise, the year 2019 looks to be no different. At Learning Crafters we are lucky to have an inside view to much of the development happening in the learning technology space thanks to our work with some of the leading technology vendors. Therefore, we thought it would be worthwhile to share some of our thoughts, views and first-hand experiences on what’s ahead for the industry next year. Hence, here are four key learning technology trends for 2019. 

Learning Technology Trend #1: Big Data will deliver exponential impact in 2019

For the past few years, organisations have been adopting tools and technologies to capture, analyse and execute on business data. While the human resources function in general seems to be lagging slightly behind in that adoption, 2019 looks to a be a big year for big data. For learning and development, the holy grail of learning data – the Experience API (xAPI) – has already been available for several years. While adoption of the xAPI standard has been slower than expected, any organisation claiming to do “learning analytics” today cannot remain credible without involving with xAPI. The old, commonplace ways of capturing learning data (e.g. SCORM) are simply not powerful enough. As we move into data-driven decision making in the L&D space, big data capabilities are an absolute requirement – and that will be delivered with xAPI. 

Learning Technology Trend #2: Artificial Intelligence (AI) will undergo rapid developments

Naturally, in the era of machines, the xAPI learning data will not only be used for analytics. Rather, this type of behavioural data (comparable e.g. to Google Analytics) will be used to develop more advanced AI. Now, what is AI good for in the learning space? 

Currently, AI in learning is being used to build adaptive, as well as personalised learning. Furthermore, the currently available more advanced AI applications are able to curate learning content based on the individual roles, needs and preferences of the learner. In 2019, we’ll definitely see major developments in both fronts. Additionally, we predict another AI application in learning analysis. In other words, the use of artificial intelligence to form insights on the link of learning and performance. 

Learning Technology Trend #3: Virtual Reality (VR) will become more “commercial” 

If you’re a learning professional and didn’t hear about VR in 2018, it’s time to go out! While a lot of the hype surrounding VR is arguably just that, hype, 2019 looks interesting. In addition to developing an industry understanding of what VR is good for, we are likely to see some major enablers.

The first major problem with VR currently is the price tag. Arguably, building VR the way companies currently build it does not enable long term adoption. Since VR is currently mostly developed with game engines, there are few possibilities for the non-tech-savvy to build content. If you look at e.g. how videos have grown the their current dominance, that’s because every single individual can produce them. 

The second major problem with VR this year has been the lack of data capabilities. Without the ability to record big data from the VR experiences, organisations cannot possibly prove the investment worthwhile. While VR experiences are definitely a great gimmick, many organisations have vastly over-invested in it. However, there’s light at the end of the tunnel already in 2019. In fact, we are already seeing some of the first VR content editors emerge. These tools require no technical knowledge, game-engines or programming and come with big data capabilities. Hence, they overcome some of the two current major problems and are set for wider adoption. 

Learning Technology Trend #4: Augmented Reality (AR) will redefine workflow learning 

While VR has been on everyone’s news feed, augmented reality has gone largely unnoticed in 2018. However, several companies both in- and outside of the learning field are developing their AR tools. With the current pipeline of technological development, AR is likely to have a major impact on bringing learning into the workflow. A lot of the initial impact will focus on the technical fields, such as engineering. 

For the first time in history, people will actually be able to learn without interruption to work. This will happen with specialised AR headsets, which you can use to open learning content into your additional layer of reality. Best of the tools will have voice control and come with remote capabilities. This enables, e.g. trainers and experts to follow the learners and guide them through activities. Through a live connection, the trainers may influence the “reality” visible to the learner. Furthermore, the advanced headsets will likely incorporate cameras and tracking capabilities to capture great amounts of data. This data will be incredibly useful both for learning and the business as a whole, as it enables a totally new level of recording work, understanding workflows and the learning happening during them.

Now, the four technologies here represent only a part of the future of learning, but arguably they’re the most hyped. Later, we’ll look at some other technologies as well as emerging methodological trends in L&D. 

Is your organisation ready to take advantage of the upcoming technological developments in the learning space? If not, we’re happy to work with you in building that capability. Just contact us. 

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Supporting Bloom’s Taxonomy Learning Objectives with Digital Methods

Bloom's taxonomy digital learning methods cover

Supporting Bloom’s Taxonomy Learning Objectives with Digital Methods

For several decades, Bloom’s taxonomy has belonged to many L&D professionals toolbox. While the frameworks itself are somewhat dated, they still provide good tools for structuring learning objectives. In fact, along with Kirkpatrick’s model for training evaluation, the taxonomy is perhaps the second most prevalent industry staple. While in the future we are likely to move more into performance-based learning objectives, we still continue to educate people in knowledge heavy areas where immediate performance impact is not self-evident. Hence, it pays to evaluate how we can use Bloom’s framework today in the learning space where a digital forms a large part of the delivery. Therefore, we’ll look at Bloom’s taxonomy in more detail and how to support it with digital learning methods. 

The six levels of Bloom’s taxonomy progress as follows: 

  1. Knowledge
  2. Comprehension
  3. Application
  4. Analysis
  5. Synthesis
  6. Evaluation

Delivering “Knowledge” with Digital 

For a long time, digital (or eLearning for that matter) has been a common way of delivering knowledge. However, to fulfil the knowledge part of the learning objectives according to Bloom’s taxonomy, we have to pay attention to the delivery. Firstly, it’s highly important to understand what helps learners to remember and recall knowledge. Tools and methods like spaced learning and microlearning are modern ways of structuring digital content to aid in just that. 

Ensuring “Comprehension” with knowledge checks

When developing learning, we’d naturally like the learners to grasp the concepts beyond just the factual level. Hence, it’s important to build adequate comprehension elements into digital learning experiences. While an increasing part of the comprehension analytics can be accomplished with seamless learning tracking, on many occasions it’s good to build proper assessment. Generally, you should build assessment and knowledge checks that go beyond factual recollection. Furthermore, it’s beneficial to distribute the knowledge checks within the materials and space them over time. 

Supporting “Application” with digital 

Generally, the application part of the Bloom’s taxonomy and learning equation occurs in the workplace. However, that’s not to say we shouldn’t utilise the power of digital to facilitate that application to the best of our ability. Ideally, the scope of your learning analytics would cover the relevant behavioural and performance metrics to find out whether application is actually happening. In case your data capabilities are not yet at that level, you can (besides contacting us for help!) use different techniques to try to gauge the rate of application. For instance, digital surveys and 360 evaluations provide tools to assess behaviours on both individual and organisational level. However, keep in mind that self-reported data is often full of bias! 

Facilitating the “Analysis” of knowledge

A good part of learning deals with understanding what we already know and how that related to the grand scheme of things. Naturally, you can facilitate the analysis part with various types of self-paced assignments requiring critical thinking. In the age of digital, however, you could use the power of social media tools to facilitate social learning. Modern social learning tools provide a good way for learners to develop a deeper understanding of the concepts at hand and their relationship with current workplace practices and strategy. This enables learners not only to rely on their own conceptual understanding but to learn from others’ as well. 

Providing a platform to “Synthesise” information

Building on the analysis stage, the synthesis of knowledge is highly important to bring the learning back to the workplace. With highly abstract topics (e.g. leadership, soft skills etc.), collaborative learning activities can deliver high impact. As synthesis is a lot about creating new ways of working based on the newly learnt and existing knowledge, you’ll want to focus on that. At this stage, the confines of the learning system (e.g. LMS) become too narrow, and we need to find other pathways to success. Collaboration tools (e.g. Slack) provide a good platform to not only support learning, but also to produce and share work and practical applications of the newly learnt. If you’re not yet employing collaborative platforms, user-generated content can be a meaningful way to execute some of this as well. Learners can e.g. share their experiences of different applications and learn from others. 

Enabling reflective “Evaluation” via digital platforms

The highest level of Bloom’s taxonomy is evaluation. Evaluation generally involves presenting and defending opinions based on the developed conceptual knowledge and synthesis. Similar to “Synthesis”, collaborative and social learning tools provide great mediums for facilitating the evaluation level. Learners can share their own opinions, engage with others’ and hence refine their thinking. While there’s a lot of tools for this type of delivery, a proper mindset is equally important. As an organisation, you should encourage the sharing of opinions. To do this successfully, you naturally need to acknowledge that those opinions may be critical or not aligned with the current practice. However, you should not aim to silence all the critics as it is these types of discussions that spark internal innovation in organisations. 

Are you using Bloom’s taxonomy to structure your learning objectives? Would you like to find out more about different digital methods to support the learning process? If so, just contact us here – we’re happy to share! 

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Rapid eLearning Authoring Tools – 3 Behaviours to Avoid

Rapid eLearning Authoring tools

Rapid eLearning Authoring Tools – 3 Behaviours to Avoid

During the past several years, we’ve seen rapid eLearning authoring tools become massively popular among instructional designers and learning professionals. Generally, rapid eLearning tools comprise of different slide-based authoring tools. Compared to the “old”, programming-heavy eLearning development, these tools provide huge advantages. Learning professionals’ work becomes faster and easier, thanks to the built-in capabilities and massive content libraries. Due to the efficiency, these tools have become a standard of sorts for eLearning development. This has led to a worrying development – professionals believing these tools solve all eLearning needs. Don’t get me wrong, we love the tools and use them on a daily basis ourselves. However, there are a few things that we like to remind learning professionals of when working with these.

Slide-based learning is not the answer for everything

A vast majority of the most popular rapid eLearning authoring tools are slide-based (e.g. Articulate, iSpring, Captivate). As wonderful as these tools are, the slide structure empowering them is also their biggest problem. Sometimes e.g. videos or animations will provide a much better result than slide-based elements. Instead of automatically resorting to a storyboard or slide-based course, learning professionals should consider what could be the most effective modalities out there. The rise of mobile learning has brought about another problem for these rapid eLearning tools. The slide-based output is not really mobile friendly. Sure, all the major providers support HTML5 and have even worked on built their own mobile players. Yet, the user experience leaves a lot to be desired, e.g. readability, font sizes, image scaling etc.

You should never sacrifice interactivity for faster development

The wonderful quality of rapid eLearning authoring tools is in their name. “Rapid”. The unique value proposition of these slide-based tools is that you are able to build much more interactive material with them. You can prompt learners with questions, build adaptive branching scenarios, gamification, assessment and much more. The unfortunate fact is that many learning professionals don’t take advantage of these capabilities. The result of eLearning authoring may be a slide deck with very little interactivity, except an integrated test in the end. In terms of learning value, the result is very close to a powerpoint presentation (read: very little value). Digital learning needs to be interactive, and unfortunately it takes a bit of time. But if you’re not using the rapid eLearning authoring tools to build interactive learning, you might as well not use them at all.

Too many templates result in too little variety

Another factor considerably speeding up the content development process with rapid eLearning authoring tools is templates. Just like in powerpoint and other slide deck builders, you can build pre-defined templates to use across the spectrum. With a good template master, you could potentially save yourself almost all the visual design work. However, the problem with using too many templates is the variety of end products. If you’re using rapid eLearning authoring tools, I suspect you’re not only building one course. Instead, you’re building many. And when you build many, the courses start to repeat themselves very fast, even though the actual content is different. This is a killer for learning engagement. Learners grow easily frustrated with the lack of variety and learning becomes just a click-through exercise rather than immersing in engaging and fresh content.

Overall, many companies do use these tools to their full potential. However, as they are so easy and quick to use, it’s easy to space away and forget what really makes a great learning experience. Be vary of that, and try to avoid the behaviours above!

Are you using rapid eLearning tools or would you like to give them a try? We can recommend you some of our favourites that we frequently use. Just drop us a note

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