5 Tools for Corporate Learning Campaigns

Corporate learning campaign tools

5 Tools for Corporate Learning Campaigns

Finally it’s ready. You’ve just designed and rolled out a great learning program for your entire organisation. You’ve spent months working on it, but now it’s finally out there. The best content, great modalities of delivery, highly relevant topics – everything seems to be in place. But once you launch, the excitement stops. You find that only 15% of your people have used the program, whereas you intended it for the whole organisation. Rest assured, many L&D professionals face similar kinds of problems. They design great learning, but nobody knows about it, and therefore it goes to waste. However, you shouldn’t give up just yet! You just need to start running some corporate learning campaigns! Here are 5 tools for effective awareness generation at the workplace.

Email campaigns and newsletters

Despite the common sentiment, email is still a highly effective medium – just ask any marketing professional! If you want to create awareness around your corporate learning programs, email is a natural tool. As it’s probably the most widely used channel for official engagement, you have some of your work cut out for you. Nudging learners towards your content and reminding them about self-development can go long way. Also, should you want to add more marketing flair to it, you can consider e.g. newsletters. And don’t worry about getting your people to sign up to your learning campaign mailing list – you already have their emails!

Text messages get you closer

Some marketing research has found that text messages are in fact the medium with the highest open rate. People tend to open text messages immediately, contrary to e.g. email. Therefore, text messages can be more effective for inciting fast reactions. Some organisations have gone even further than just text message learning campaigns by using the medium for content distribution as well. E.g. you could easily distribute microlearning resources this way.

Follow the logic of banner ads

In organisations, especially large ones, there tends to be a lot of complicated software and tools that people have to use. Sometimes it’s too much to remember it all. Following the logic of banner ads that you see on just about every web shop, you could link learning resources back to their contextual environment. E.g. if an employees needs to deal with with the ERP system, you could display banner ads about the learning resources related to the use of that software within the software itself. In general, if your using company devices, it’s possible to display these kind of banners just about anywhere, e.g. on the employees’ desktop or screensaver.

Social channels can generate buzz

If your company has internal social media channels or similar kinds of productivity tools (e.g. Slack), they provide a natural habitat for corporate learning campaigns. These social channels enable you to spread the word quickly, and you can also enlist the help of your colleagues in spreading the word. Liking and commenting on posts, or sharing learning programs can provide the much needed personal testimonial that helps you to get more people to come onboard. You could also take a play out of the modern marketer’s playbook, and incentivise such sharing via referral campaigns.

Referral campaigns can create a snowball effect

The referral marketing scene has exploded in recent years. Just about any software or internet economy company has a referral program. In general, this is a trend that you could use in learning campaigns as well. Incentivise your people to share desired messages or their own testimonials about training programs and reward them for e.g. visibility, clicks, sign-ups or as their referrals complete the program. The rewards could range from non-monetary incentives to even aspirational ones. You decide how much you want to invest making sure people find your learning programs!

Final words

In our day-to-day, we see an unfortunate amount of learning programs and resources having sub-optimal usage or even going to waste. It’s not that the programs are not great, they are, it’s just that people don’t often know about them. Therefore, take a note of these learning campaign tools, and use them to get people to sign up for your own internal programs! If you need help in designing campaigns or the learning programs itself, we can help. Just drop us a note here.

2020 eLearning Predictions – Towards Smarter L&D

eLearning Predictions for 2020

Towards Smarter L&D – eLearning Predictions for 2020

As we’re setting our sights on 2020, we can reflect on how the field of L&D developed in 2019. However, it’s also important to keep an eye on the future, and the things that are around the corner. Whereas learning technologies are advancing at a great pace, the field of L&D is undergoing a philosophical shift too. Without further a do, here are our 2020 eLearning predictions and thoughts for the new year.

Learning technology “stacks” become more fragmented

One thing that we’ve witnessed over the past year is the growing shift away from conventional LMS systems. Legacy systems have not been particularly learner-centric, and that has become a challenge. Therefore, we are seeing the new category of Learning Experience Platforms (LXP) emerge. However, it seems that this space is going to move into a massive gray area, whereas LMSs are getting more LXP-like features and vice versa.

However, it’s likely that in the midst of this shift, organisations have realised that one product may not rule them all. These big systems and platforms have traditionally tried to do “a bit of everything”. Yet, we are learning to appreciate tools for specific uses that work well for just that task. For instance, there might be a great tool for a particular type of learning, e.g. social learning for leadership, but you’ll certainly need more tools alongside it. Hence, one of our 2020 eLearning predictions is that we’ll see more variety in technology. Should this prediction materialise, it’s important to make sure your learning technology is well integrated.

Move towards more human-centred learning experiences

While the past couple of decades have seen a big push for digitalisation, we might have been a bit too fast at times. It’s unfortunately easy to forget the learner itself. As an eLearning prediction for 2020, it seems likely that we are starting to re-evaluate how we approach the whole concept. Whereas learner-centric design and methods are getting a lift, we’ll also look to see a focus on fitness for purpose. After all, we are not learning for learning’s sake at the workplace, but to do our jobs better.

For the future, we hope to not be judged by the quantity, but rather the quality of content and experiences. As we reflect back, we can say that less is often more when it comes to learning. And we should live by that. Also, if we wish to build great experiences for our learners, we need to build empathy. Along with other design thinking methods, empathy helps us to focus on the human, the learner – the individual.

Increased focus on evaluation, measurement and analytics

Finally, one field that is rising constantly, is the field of learning analytics. For another eLearning prediction for 2020, it seems evident that this trend is only growing stronger. L&D has been in a difficult position for quite a while. A lot of great work is being done, but credibly proving that the work is worthwhile has proven to be a challenge. With the emergence of tools like xAPI and AI, we have reached technical capability.

However, an area we still need to spend time on is the methods. Unfortunately, the way we evaluate learning in organisations is often simply lacklustre. Feedback forms, “happy sheets” and assessment that only tests immediate recall doesn’t quite cut it from a methodological point of view. On the other hand, it’s not even enough to do that. As learning transfer is actually the important part, that’s what we should assess. Corporate learning only produced results if it gets people to change their behaviours in a way that positively supports the business. And what this means is that L&D is going to have to dive much deeper into the business in 2020!

How to Design Alignment in Corporate Learning

Alignment in corporate learning

How to Design Alignment in Corporate Learning

If your corporate learning lacks engagement – or strategic focus – it might be due to problems in alignment. Aligning corporate learning with various stakeholder goals is incredibly important. By aligning with employees, you build engagement and relevance, whereas focusing on the business can build strategic value. However, it’s not always easy connecting these two. Therefore, we’ll take a look at how you could design alignment in workplace learning.

Aligning learning with business goals

First, let’s start with the business goals, as they arguably tend to most often come first. Whether that’s the best way, we’ll let you decide! There’s a lot of talk about aligning learning with business goals, and that seems to be a priority for many L&D professionals. In most cases, the L&D tends to try act as an executor of some bigger vision from the organisation’s senior leadership (e.g. we want to become an innovative organisation). While certainly strategic, you’ll want to pay attention to the problem space in particular in these kind of cases, i.e. is learning even the right tool to solve this kind of strategic issues? In some cases, it might not be, and hence producing learning or training programs to try to address the problem is not gonna yield very much results.

However, aligning corporate learning with business goals can also happen on a more granular level. Everything doesn’t have to be big and strategic. Ultimately, the goal of L&D is to help people perform better at their jobs. Therefore, putting yourself out there, and asking exactly that can be a powerful tool. By focusing on real issues faced by real employees, you provide tangible value. The learning component represents much less of formal learning than it used to, but it’s not a bad thing! Also, as you’re working on practical business problems, you also have tangible metrics to measure your learning success against.

Aligning corporate learning with individual goals

While the alignment with business goals is important, it’s not everything you should do. Many organisations face challenges due to engagement in training programs, and the lack of it. The lack of engagement, on the other hand, might be result of low to no alignment.

First of all, getting people to learn is already a challenge on its own. In reality, people don’t really respond to e.g. strategic objectives as a way of justifying why they should go through training. To nourish engagement in learning programs, you need to convince people that it benefits them, not just the company. Secondly, the benefits themselves might come in various forms, and it’s necessary to communicate them in order to facilitate change. Perhaps the training unlocks career opportunities or prepares people for specific tasks. It might also be just a new way of doing the existing work that is easier, more convenient or less cumbersome. Or finally, the benefit might even be personal (e.g. a lot of soft skills training might carry benefits beyond the immediate scope of work).

Once you identify those individual value points, delivering meaningful and engaging learning becomes much easier. Then it’s just a matter of communicating the benefits! That’s where L&D can borrow a few tricks from marketing, or where storytelling might become a good tool to use. Also, thinking of learning from an individual or employee perspective provides a good opportunity to critically review some of the activities an organisation might be doing. If there’s no individual value-add to be found, it’s likely that the “bigger” business value is not out there either.

Final words

Overall, the best corporate learning programs manage to combine these two. They might start out with an individual value proposition (i.e. what does an employee get out of it personally) but tie that in to the bigger business goals and ways of achieving them. As the learners see immediate value to their own selves and jobs, they are much more likely to implement the learning in practice, and by doing so, make progress towards the business goals. Furthermore, starting to think about the employees first is a good stepping stone into a more learner-centric culture. If you’re facing challenges in learning engagement, and think you could use some help, don’t hesitate to drop us a note. We’d be happy to discover problems together.

Storytelling in Corporate Learning – 3 Impactful Uses

Storytelling in Corporate Learning

Storytelling in Corporate Learning – 3 Impactful Uses

In a world full of noise, you won’t get yourself heard without a story. Telling stories has become incredibly important. Whereas the world is full of information, facts and data, we can only process a very limited quantity of it. To get ourselves heard, we need to connect emotionally to our audience and present compelling narratives. It’s unlikely that you’ll be able to win people over and evoke change with facts. In the realm of workplace learning, we first need to get people to listen, then to remember, and finally to act. Therefore, we need stories too. Here are three impactful uses for storytelling in corporate learning.

1. Increase the retention of learning content

People don’t really remember facts, but they do remember stories. To understand this, look no further than the award-winning advertisements and campaigns of recent years. Companies have stopped talking about their products and services, or even themselves. Rather, they tell stories about their values and people. And people do end up buying, because they remember those stories.

Storytelling in corporate learning works in a similar fashion. Learning retention is one of the common problems with learning initiatives. We tend to pack our learning content with data and facts, but end up doing a disservice to our learners. Instead, we should focus on telling stories. Stories that portray e.g. our customers, or the people in the organisation. This puts a humanising touch to the learning experience, whether it’s online or offline.

Furthermore, good storytelling practices also force us to focus on what matters. Good stories cannot be packed with information. Every point that is less than 100% relevant to the story dilutes its impact. Therefore, when building stories, the aim is to go as bare-bones as possible, to only include the most relevant facts. From a learning point of view, this helps the learners to get the necessary information quickly and avoid the excess clutter. Often, less is more when it comes to corporate learning.

2. Communicate the ‘why’ of new learning initiatives

The practice of workplace learning is undergoing big shifts. Most companies are looking for ways to digitalise learning and implement new learning technologies in the workplace. With shifts like these, we are often introducing new ways of working and doing things. Yet, we don’t always communicate it very well.

When undergoing digital transformation, most companies tend to focus on the ‘what’ and ‘how’ of the change. What is going the be the new way? How are going to do it? The problem is, that is not interesting, and people won’t listen. Instead, we should put a heavy emphasis on the ‘why’. People may not even agree with the ‘what’ or the ‘how’, but if you’re good in communicating the ‘why’, they are much more likely to rally behind your cause. Connect with the audience, and communicate shared values, and you’ll get them on board. Good storytelling in corporate learning focuses on and starts from the ‘why’.

3. Get people to put knowledge into action

Retention is not the only challenge in corporate learning, perhaps not even the biggest one. In fact, the biggest challenge is often behavioural change. Once we get the knowledge installed in the learners’ minds, the question becomes whether they’ll actually put it into practice. Without adequate support, they statistically won’t, and learning transfer will remain low. Yet, telling stories could help in this regard too.

Good storytelling in corporate learning gets people to put the learnt into practice, to do it. By featuring stories of people who have implemented particular knowledge or skills at their work, we create a path for others to follow. Good stories can be testimonials, but they can also be more concrete, practical how-to examples. Once learners see other people in similar jobs and contexts telling their stories of success, or even failure, they are much more likely to take the leap and do it themselves.

Final words

Telling stories is more and more important, even in corporate learning. It enables us to get people on board, have them listen and remember, as well as put the learnt into practice. A storytelling mindset also helps learning professionals focus on what’s important: communicating ‘why’ and cutting out unnecessary information that would only overload the learners. If you need help in building better storytelling in your corporate learning, we may be able to help. Just drop us a note here.

Virtual Classrooms in Workplace Learning – Do They Add Value?

Virtual Classroom in corporate learning

Virtual Classrooms in Workplace Learning – Do They Add Value?

As organisations have been digitalising learning and training, we’ve seen many opting for largely asynchronous methods. While self-paced learning can be a great value-add, it requires a certain degree of learning culture in the organisation. However, it’s unlikely that any organisation is able to cover all its training needs via these methods. Some topics do need active facilitation or down-right training. In such cases, organisations again face the challenge of scalability. Initially, companies employed webinars to solve this challenge, but conventional webinars have been challenging as a medium. However, as the technologies have matured and we’ve refined the methods, the concept of the virtual classroom has come about.

What’s a virtual classroom?

While the actual technical tools between corporate virtual classrooms and webinars or video conferences are rather similar, the difference comes from the methodological side. Conventionally, webinars for instance have been quite a passive and one-way medium, resembling a lecture delivered to a large audience. However, virtual classrooms are more collaborative in nature. They are designed to facilitate all the different levels of interactivity and are more learner-centric in nature. The instructor is not there just to go through content and provide a live voice track to a powerpoint, but rather to facilitate discussions and prompt the learners to engage in different ways.

In addition to just displaying content and video, these virtual sessions may be structured around different kinds of activities like user polling, discussion boards, group chats, sharing of user-generated content or smaller, private breakout sessions.

Different corporate use cases for the virtual classroom

Now, there are a lot of different use cases for these kinds of tools. Here are a few that we picked that might provide further value-add in corporate use.

Collaborative learning experiences

Often the real value of getting people together is in the possibility to collaborate. Thus, once you have that, it doesn’t necessarily make sense to use the virtual face-to-face time for lecturing or going through content. Rather, a virtual classroom session is a good opportunity to do more collaborative learning activities. For instance, you can use the time for discussions and reflections to develop shared understanding of the topic in question. Hearing your peers’ reflections on a topic or the way they’ve executed it in practice can be very valuable. Furthermore, you could also extend such collaborative approach to solve real business issues through problem-based learning.

Expert-led sessions

It’s hard to get people in the same place at the same time, especially when the people are busy and sought after experts of their own field. However, a virtual classroom approach may give more opportunities for that. For instance, an expert panel discussion or a fireside chat would be quite convenient to organise in such format. On the other hand, the approach might be useful for e.g. senior leaders in a global organisation to communicate vision and strategy and open themselves for discussion and elaboration on such topics. While we don’t think that these can ever totally replace e.g. company town halls, for some uses they might be the conscious, smart option.

Virtual coaching

Coaching is arguably one of the most powerful modalities of learning. It’s intimate, it’s personal, it’s supportive. However, conventional coaching can be expensive and faces the same challenge as other face-to-face formats when it comes to scheduling. Again, virtual classroom could help to solve some of that. Coaches could engage both groups and individuals remotely and interchangeably. For instance, a coaching session could consist of the coach delivering general level advice to a group. Then, the session could break into 1-on-1 sessions to provide personalised advice and support. Digital tools can also help coaches in managing their students and their progress.

Final words

Overall, there’s probably still a lot of value in synchronous learning methods such as the virtual classroom. However, smart organisations should try to use that face-to-face time in meaningful manner, leveraging on the opportunities to collaborate rather than lecture. In global organisations, this can not only provide major cost savings, but also help to connect people and develop shared understanding across different cultures. If you’re looking to leverage virtual classrooms, or struggling to get your trainers to shift away from lectures, we may be able to help. Just contact us here.

Problem-based Learning as a Tool for Innovation

Problem-based learning

Problem-based Learning as a Tool for Innovation

One of the challenges in corporate learning is that activities tend to be distant from the business itself. Furthermore, formal programs tend to be somewhat inflexible, focusing too much on content rather than context. An interesting approach to tackle these problems and a handful of more could be found in problem-based learning. While certainly not applicable to every kind of training topic, problem-based learning can help to enhance collaboration, teamwork and culture. More importantly, the method can also become a method of innovation within the organisation. Here’s the way we see it:

What’s problem-based learning all about?

As the name might give away, problem-based learning is centred around solving problems. The method is increasingly popular in leading universities around the globe. Business school case work can be a good example of the method. The problems are open-ended, meaning there are no predefined right answers or solutions. Furthermore, the subject matter in question only plays a minor part in the learning. The learners will naturally develop their capabilities around different skills like teamwork, collaboration and communication. However, for companies, this provides a tool for learning while solving real business problems.

The method as a tool for corporate innovation

In addition to having people learn to collaborate better, problem-based learning methods could have a significant value-adding offer to corporates. Having people work on real business problems, and organising it in a smart way could help to source ideas, insights, process innovation and solutions from within the organisation. Furthermore, it could help to expose people the different parts of the organisational value chain, and hence have them understand the business in more holistic terms.

How to do it in practice?

Here’s a list of things and processes we would like to install into a corporate problem-based learning program.

  • Form groups of diverse individuals. Mix participant groups from different business units, departments or even locations. To come up with innovative solutions, we must avoid tunnel vision.
  • Introduce the learners to a real business problem. If needed, have a person working on the topic brief the participants. However, remember to keep it a blank slate. Don’t put boundaries in place.
  • Ask people to come with solutions to the problem! However, as business problems are complex, give the participants adequate time to come up with novel solutions. Also, it’s good to have learners present the ideas to the heads of the business.

In general, the more diverse groups you can assemble, the better. If you’re trying to solve an operations problem with people just from operations, don’t expect great results. You may get small improvements, but radical innovation rarely happens that way. On the other hand, it’s easier for people with little prior knowledge to question and re-evaluate the existing practices.

In terms of facilitation, a blended learning approach may work best in problem-based learning. It’s a good idea for the participants to meet in and organise around physical workshops. But digital mediums and social learning tools can be helpful in keeping the collaboration going in between the workshops. For instance, a collaborative platform can enable participants to share ideas, insights and thoughts to the group immediately, and thus “record” them.

Final thoughts

Overall, problem-based learning can provide an effective tool for not only learning, but also to source innovative solutions to everyday business problems. As a learning experience, the method is highly collaborative, and thus touches on the practical aspects of communication, teamwork, leadership, project management etc. However, the best thing about it might just be that it doesn’t really feel like learning. Instead of mindlessly going through courses, your employees can actually contribute to the business whiled developing themselves. Could just be a much more fun way of doing (at least some of the) corporate learning!

Why We Need Design Thinking in Corporate Learning

Design thinking in corporate learning

Why We Need Design Thinking in Corporate Learning

Unless you’ve been living in a basement for the past few years, chances are you’ve heard of design thinking. While the term has become a buzzword, and all sorts of vendors have spawned to offer services within the space – some more ambiguous than others – the underlying ideas and concepts are something an L&D professional should not ignore. We though we’d explore those ideas and concepts, and give you our thoughts on where we see the value. So, let’s look at why we should use design thinking in corporate learning.

Design thinking (the way we see it)

To avoid unnecessary buzzword sprees, we’ll skip the text book definitions. (If you’re totally new to design thinking, Google is your friend!) Perhaps worth mentioning is that design thinking is often defined as a process, but we don’t think that always does enough justice to it. There’s a danger of oversimplifying things and too rigid processes are not something that necessarily benefit design work.

That being said, the core ideas and concepts that make the process valuable are its big emphasis on discovery, research and user involvement. These are followed by ideation, experimentation, learning from mistakes and iterating. If you’re planning to put the methods into practice, it’s good to understand what these might look like from an L&D’s viewpoint.

Why is design thinking important in corporate learning?

Fundamentally, there are no learning problems in businesses. All of it is first and foremost business problems. Sometimes, though, learning might be a valid solution. Furthermore, big challenge in corporate learning is rarely the knowledge delivery and acquisition, but learning transfer, i.e. whether people apply the newly learnt in practice. Keeping these in mind, let’s look at the different design thinking concepts and why they can provide value.

Firstly, proper discovery is really important. As mentioned, all the problems are business problems and learning is a solution to only some of them. If we bypass proper discovery and blindly offer learning whenever someone asks for it, we are not doing any good. Furthermore, discovery is important for the learning design phase too. If you want to have people apply the learning, it has to be easy. Hence, it’s critical to understand the context of the learners. Even good content will go to deff ears if you don’t understand the context.

Secondly, ideation as an open process should be something to go through, even if at small scale. A set time for open exploration enables L&D to look beyond their own immediate scope of work and identify potential solutions that are not necessarily about learning. This helps you get closer to what the people actually need, rather than blindly providing what you think they need.

Finally, experimentation is one thing that you shouldn’t neglect either. Small pilots, test runs and demos let you collect data and validate assumptions before moving onto large scale implementation. But whether you’re doing small or large, it’s important to continuously learn about how people engage with whatever it is that you’ve provided them with. Too often L&D are in a hurry to roll out a solution, but stop the work once the solutions is out. Great solutions are the products of usually multiple iterations, that are made based on previous mistakes and learning.

Final comments

Overall, design thinking as a method or a process is something that any L&D professional should be aware of. However, the key takeaway from it shouldn’t necessarily be any rigid process itself. Rather, we should aim to understand what makes these kind of methods a near necessity in building the workplace learning of the future. Also, understanding the philosophy of why it’s imperative to spend time on discovery, engaging with the users or constantly learning and iterating is important. Ultimately, L&D is about helping people succeed at their jobs and the business to perform better. Taking a design thinking angle to it might help to better address those issues.

How to Enable Self-directed Learning in the Workplace?

Self-directed learning in the workplace

How to Enable Self-directed Learning in the Workplace?

Imagine an organisation where employees would proactively learn the things they need to perform and take charge of upskilling themselves for the future. Sounds like every L&D professional’s dream, doesn’t it? In fact, more and more organisations are exploring for ways to achieve some of that, even if with limited scope. On one hand, we’ve realised that the traditional organisation of L&D activities is not agile enough to respond to the rapidly transforming business environment. On the other hand, there’s also a lot of of talk about 21st century employees having to take charge of their own learning and development. This type of self-directed learning is certainly not a new thing for individuals. However, organisations still have a fair bit to learn in facilitating it.

So, let’s explore self-directed workplace learning in a bit more detail. Here are a few key pieces we think need to be in place for this individual-led approach to be successful.

Organisations need to allow time for learning

This may sound overly self-evident, but in fact is a fundamental consideration. While an added benefit of self-directed learning is the flexibility it provides, organisations can’t expect their employees to learn on their own time. Some employees of course likely will do that, but a large part of them won’t. Thus, it’s important to make it clear that learning is part of the work of every employee, and to allow time within the “office hours” for it. If the whole organisation doesn’t support the approach and promote a self-learning culture, the impact will be very limited.

Managers’ commitment is crucial in facilitating self-directed learning

One of the key stakeholders in enabling a self-directed workplace learning culture are the managers. As previously mentioned, the managers need to firstly commit to the fact that their employees will be spending some of their time learning. But that’s not quite enough. The managers need to also take an active approach in following up with the learners who are having difficulties or are not engaging. They should also take an active role in identifying challenges and guiding people towards the right resources. Some employees will likely require more elaborate coaching on what self-directed learning is, and how they should be going about it. After all, the approach doesn’t necessarily come naturally for everyone.

Organisations should offer employees resources and tools

One key part of a feasible self-directer learning strategy is the resources and tools that employees can use. Sure, Google, YouTube and similar platforms exist. However, expecting employees to search for information, assess its value and relevance is likely too much to ask. Especially if you’re only beginning the journey and people are not used to self-directed learning. Thus, it’s important to offer employees resources and tools to take charge of their own learning. These can be a variety of things. Many organisations nowadays choose to curate learning resources, rather than designing everything from scratch. With this, employees get access to material that has been already vetted, and they no longer need to spend time evaluating it.

Increasingly many organisations also offer their employees collaborative and social platforms, where employees can interact with each other. These can provide a valuable informal learning resource. Often, it might make more sense to just ask someone, rather than find videos or other material on how to complete a particular task.

Never try to force people to learn, but encourage them

Finally, this one is a major issue we regularly notice with organisations who attempt to execute self-directed learning. For some reason, organisations expect that they can become self-directed, while they still “direct” people by forcing learning. For instance, this can be requiring employees to complete learning activities, set deadlines or impose other kinds of rules. This is what many L&D departments are used to, but it simply doesn’t work if you want to develop a self-directed learning culture. We cannot force people to learn.

However, that doesn’t remove the importance of encouraging employees to learn. In fact, some studies indicate considerable performance improvements pertaining to self-directed learning. But only in cases where the learning is voluntary. As we’ve mentioned before, organisations should make their absolute best efforts in promoting that culture and committing to it. People won’t take up on it unless they see their superiors and the people around them showing commitment to it.

Final words

All in all, building a self-directed workplace learning culture is by no means easy. It requires L&D to relinquish some control and accept the fact that everything cannot be strictly administered. For many organisations, this sort of change likely represents total cultural transformation. However, if you want to become a truly agile and effective organisation, we see this as a necessary step along the way. If you’d like to explore ways of facilitating self-directed learning in your organisation, don’t hesitate to drop us a note. We can’t promise quick wins or guaranteed success, but we can certainly help you learn about what might work and what might not.

Kaufman’s Learning Evaluation Model – Quick Overview

Kaufman's Learning Evaluation Model

Kaufman’s Learning Evaluation Model – Quick Overview

The field of corporate learning has a lot of different frameworks for evaluation. While not all of them are good or even necessary, some frameworks still provide good points of consideration and models for organising information. For instance, last week, we took a look at the Success Case Method which works best on capturing qualitative insights. This week, we decided to take a quick look at Kaufman’s learning evaluation model, and see if it still provides valid contributions.

Kaufman’s Learning Evaluation Model briefly explained

Instead of providing an entirely new framework, Kaufman’s model aims to improve the commonly used Kirkpatrick’s 4 levels. The allegedly improved version introduces some additional consideration by seemingly dividing Kirkpatrick level 1 into two and adding a fifth level. The levels and the respective questions and considerations for modern L&D professionals go as following:

  1. Input – what kind of resources and learning materials do we have at our disposal that we can use to support the learning experience?
  2. Process – how’s the delivery of the learning experience? Is it accepted? How are people responding to it?
  3. Micro level results – Did the learner or the learning group acquire the knowledge? Did they apply it on their jobs?
  4. Macro level results – Did performance improve due to this learning and application of new in the workplace? What kind of benefits arose from the learning on an organisational level?
  5. Mega level impact – What kind of impact did the learning have on society or larger external stakeholder groups?

Reflection on the Kaufman model

As the original author proposed the model as an improvement over Kirkpatrick’s, we’ll make the comparison accordingly. The separation of input and process might be a good one to make. Nowadays, we have access to vast pools of digital resources both in the public domain and sitting in corporate information systems. There are a lot of situations where organisations could leverage on a lot of this information and resources. For instance, curation-based learning content strategies might make more sense for some organisations. Hence, the introduction of inputs as a separate consideration might be a helpful change to some on the framework level.

Reversely, Kaufman also groups Kirkpatrick’s levels 2 and 3 together. While these are just semantic changes, it’s within this section that organisations have their L&D challenges. Often, learning is not the problem, and people may retain the newly learnt quite well. But the problem often comes in application, or learning transfer, as people fail to use these new skills or practices back at their daily jobs. Consequently, that’s something that modern L&D professionals should also focus more on.

Finally, Kaufman’s learning evaluation model introduces the “mega level”, or societal impact. While it may be a valid consideration for a select few, presumably this impact would go hand-in-hand with the business results analysed at the “macro level”. Or if not, we nevertheless encounter the immense difficulty of evaluating impact to external entities.

What’s in it for the L&D professional?

Like with any of the prevalent frameworks or models of evaluating learning at the workplace, it’s important not to take things too seriously. These models do provide a good basis for structuring one’s approach to evaluation, but L&D professionals should still adjust them to fit the context of their particular organisation. It’s also noteworthy that all these models were built on the conception of formal learning. Hence they may fail to address some more informal workplace learning. Regardless, the key takeaway from Kaufman’s learning evaluation model could be the notion of existing resources that can contribute to learning experiences. It’s not always necessary to reinvent the wheel after all!

If you’re looking for new ways of evaluating learning, especially learning transfer or business impact, drop us a note. We’d be happy to help you co-engineer evaluation methods that can actually demonstrate L&D’s value to the business.

Quick Guide: Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method in Workplace Learning

How to use Brinkerhoff's Success Case Method in workplace learning?

How to Use Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method in Workplace Learning

There are a lot of different frameworks that organisations use to evaluate the impact of their workplace learning initiatives. The Kirkpatrick model and the Philips ROI model may be the most common ones. While the Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method is perhaps a less known one, it can too provide value when used correctly. In this post, we’ve compiled a quick overview of the method and how to use it to support L&D decisions in your organisations.

What’s the Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method?

The method is the brainchild of Dr. Robert Brinkerhoff. While many of its original applications relate to organisational learning and human resources development, the method is applicable to a variety of business situations. The aim is to understand impact by answering the following four questions:

  • What’s really happening?
  • What results, if any, is the program helping to produce?
  • What is the value of the results?
  • How could the initiative be improved?

As you may guess from the questions, the Success Case Method’s focus is on qualitative analysis and learning from both successes and failures on a program level to improve for the future. On one hand, you’ll be answering what enabled the successful to succeed and on the other hand, what barred the worst performers from being successful.

How to use the Brinkerhoff Method in L&D?

As mentioned, the focus of the method is on qualitative analysis. Therefore, instead of using large scale analytics, the process involves surveys and individual learner interviews. By design, the method is not concerned with measuring “averages” either. Rather the aim is to learn from the most resound successes and the worst performances and then either replicate or redesign based on that information.

So ideally, you’ll want to find just a handful of individuals from both ends of the spectrum. Well-designed assessment or learning analytics can naturally help you in identifying those individuals. When interviewing people, you’ll want to make sure that their view on what’s really happening can be backed with evidence. It’s important to keep in mind that not every interview will produce a “success case”, one reason being the lack of evidence. After all, you are going to be using the information derived with this method to support your decision making, so you’ll want to get good information.

Once you’ve established the evidence, you can start looking at results. How are people applying the newly learnt? What kind of results are they seeing? This phase requires great openness. Every kind of outcome and result is a valuable one for the sake of analysis, and they are not always the outcomes that you expected when creating the program. Often training activities may have unintended application opportunities that only the people on the job can see.

When should you consider using Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method?

It’s important to acknowledge that while the method doesn’t work on everything, there are still probably more potential use cases than we can list. But these few situations are ones that in our experience benefit from such qualitative analysis.

  • When introducing a new learning initiative or a pilot. It’s always good to understand early on where a particular learning activity might be successful and where not. This lets you make changes, improvements and even pivots early on.
  • When time is of the essence. More quantitative data and insights takes time to compile (assuming you have the necessary infrastructure already in place). Sometimes we need to prove impact fast. In such cases, using the Brinkerhoff method to extract stories from real learners helps to communicate impact.
  • Whenever you want to understand the impact of existing programs on a deeper level. You may already be collecting a lot of data. Perhaps you’re already using statistical methods and tools to illustrate impact on a larger scale. However, for the simple fact that correlation doesn’t mean causation, it’s sometimes important to engage in qualitative analysis.

Final thoughts

Overall, Brinkerhoff’s Success Case Method is a good addition to any L&D professional’s toolbox. It’s a great tool for extracting stories of impact, telling them forward and learning from past successes and failures. But naturally, there should be other things in the toolbox should too. Quantitative analysis is equally important, and should be “played” in unison with the qualitative. Especially nowadays, when the L&D function is getting increased access to powerful analytics, it’s important to keep on exploring beyond the surface level to make the as informed decisions as possible to support the business.

If you are struggling to capture or demonstrate the impact of your learning initiatives, or if you’d like start doing L&D in a bit more agile manner, let us know. We can help you in implementing agile learning design methods as well as analytical tools and processes to support the business.