Corporate Learning Webinars – Are They Still “In”?

Corporate learning webinars - are they still in?

Corporate Learning Webinars – Are They Still “In”?

When the technology for live video streaming first took off, we saw webinars emerge as a concept. For learning, webinars were the first attempts to mimic face-to-face training in a digital environment. Ever since then, we’ve witnessed and incredible surge in popularity of video as learning content. But where does that leave us? Is there still a place for corporate learning webinars?

The problems with corporate learning webinars

Webinars are no longer the technological breakthrough they were back in the day. With the surge in content delivery technologies throughout the spectrum, we’ve become to notice a few problems with webinars.

The quality of video, and especially audio, are the first noticeable problem. With the advent of ever-better cameras and studio tools, we’ve grown accustomed to high quality videos, especially with long-form content. While we can utilise some of that tech for webinars, the challenge is the live aspect. For instance, the audio tracks are not edited (since it’s live!) and can thus become quite painful to listen, especially if the presenter’s microphone is not properly placed.

When it comes to corporate learning webinars, engagement is also a problem. Yes, the learners might be logged in to the session, but they space off just as easily. Overall, webinars are still quite a passive medium of engagement, where there’s limited interaction from the participants. As the learners are not interacting, they’re not retaining as much either. Furthermore, the benefit of instructor-led training should be the ability to interact with the trainer and fellow trainees; to ask questions and share opinions. That benefit doesn’t often realise in corporate learning webinars.

Solutions to the problems

Naturally, developments on technological fronts have, and continue to, enable us to solve some of these problems. Microphone technologies are becoming better and better, helping to filter out background noises and unwanted extras. Cameras have also improved tremendously, and many of them even have integrated live streaming capabilities.

While there has been progress with the hardware, the major developments have happened on the software side. First of all, webinar tools have become much more user friendly. Secondly, they have introduced a lot of possibilities for interactivity: live polls, live quizzes, chat rooms, whiteboards, document sharing and engagement monitoring are just a few examples. These have enabled us to bring the needed three levels of learning interactivity into the webinars. Thus, the audience is no longer a passive listener, but rather an active participant. For learning purposes, that makes a whole world of difference.

Should you still use corporate learning webinars? Is there a future?

Learning webinars may have that slightly outdated connotation. But if they work for you, there’s no reason to stop using them. However, do keep in mind some of the problems with webinars, and engage with your users (learners) to find out how they see your offering. If your webinars lack interactivity, you might consider delivering through some of the newer technologies on the market (we are happy to provide recommendations).

In the future, webinars will be challenged by the rise of other technologies suitable for instructor-led training, such as augmented reality. However, webinars will continue to provide the required scalability for the time these technologies are still developing. In terms of digital instructor-led training, live video is not the only solution though. Many organisations are trying out things such as instructor-led facilitation in online environments – with good results!

If you’d like recommendations for good webinar tools or help with refining your approach to digital ILT, we can help you. Just contact us to set up a meeting – even a virtual one!

More Learning Ideas

5 Tips for Better Learning Interactions

Learning Interactions Tips

5 Tips for Better Learning Interactions

To guarantee best results in learning, often an approach prompting learners to become active participants is the most successful one. For digital learning purposes, this means that we need to design interactive learning experiences. However, many organisations seemingly struggle with the concept of interactivity and its actual utility in a learning setting. Thus, here are five tips for designing better learning interactions.

1. Understand the different levels of learning interactions

As we’ve explained before, learning interactions come in mainly three different types. Most of the traditional eLearning tends to focus on learner-content interactivity. However, interactions between learners themselves and between learners and instructors are equally important. Unfortunately, these are often disregarded by corporate learning professionals, who pay too much focus on the information itself.

2. Understand different types of learning interactions

Naturally, there are a more tools of learning interactions than you could count. While you might not need all of them, it’s good to know enough of them to ensure your learning materials don’t turn out monotonous. For learner-content interactions you might use micro-quizzes, knowledge checks, interactive videos, simulations and many others. For learner-learner interactions, you may consider discussions, social media features, peer evaluation and collaborative learning activities. Finally, for learner-instructor interactions you should look into the ways learners can benefit from support, feedback or virtual facilitation.

3. Always use a mix of different learning interactions

Like with many other things, doing the same thing over and over again quickly becomes tedious and boring. The same applies to learning interactions as well. So even though you might have just developed an awesome interaction with your rapid eLearning tools, don’t get too satisfied. Rather, look into several different types of interactions working on preferably all the three different levels. Adequate variation helps to retain learners’ interest.

4. Make sure your learning interactions serve their actual purpose

A common mishap with instructional designers is to forget why we are building interactive learning in the first place. Rather than building learning interactions just for the sake of interactivity, we should pay more attention in how they help the learners to achieve their goals and assimilate information better. If using a simulation requires so much instruction that it takes away from the time spent on the actual content itself, the interaction doesn’t really serve a purpose. Likewise, if your game-based learning elements become too much about the game with vague correlation with learning, you might not be doing the right way. Thus, you should always evaluate your designs by asking “how and why does this interaction help the learner to achieve his goals?”

5. Overkill is never a good idea

In addition to the purposefulness, it’s good to understand that quality doesn’t defeat quality. Filling your content with learning interactions to the brim is not a good idea. Rather, you should use them to pace the learning at proper intervals. Often, low interactivity things like reading, glancing and viewing should still constitute the major part of the learning activity. Interactions should then be used to highlight the core focus areas and ensure the retention of them. Once more, less can be more.

Are you using learning interactions in a smart way? If you feel like you or your learning team could use help building a playbook for learning interactivity, we’d be happy to assist you. Just contact us.

More Learning Ideas

Game-Based Learning for Corporates – Why and How?

game-based learning

Game-Based Learning for Corporates – Why and How?

Games have been a popular pastime as far as history goes. However, the reach of gaming amplified significantly with the introduction of computers, and later, mobile devices. Games provide a powerful medium to activate, engage and educate. However, game-based learning has only recently emerged in the context of corporate L&D. 

Before going further, it’s important to draw a clear distinction between gamification and game-based learning. Gamification refers to the implementation of game-like features in non-game settings, whereas game-based learning involves actual games. Whereas organisations have adopted gamification successfully across many areas, game learning has a narrower scope of implementation. However, that’s not to undermine it’s impact. Here’s why you should consider game-based learning in your organisation and how you can get started with it. 

Why does game-based learning work? 

  • Games encourage active learning – you cannot progress in games by doing nothing or being passive. 
  • Games motivate the learner – there’s a sense of progress supported by achievements, trophies, competition and social elements. 
  • Learning games provide both structure and freedom. Goals, stories and rules govern the game, but players have the freedom to play as they like. 
  • Games stimulate creativity as different types of tasks may require different solutions, problem solving and inventiveness. 
  • Games provide challenges – players can compete against themselves as well as other players, individually or in teams. 

How can I get started with game-based learning?  

Knowing the basics of games and why game-based learning works, here are a few tips on how to put it into practice. 

Firstly, evaluate the learning needs carefully. Learning games are by no means a solution to all situations. Acknowledging that, it’s highly important to focus on the learning goals and desired outcomes. It’s not difficult to engage employees with brilliant games. But if they fail to produce the desired learning and performance results, they end up being a waste of time. 

Secondly, you should utilise the whole potential games have to offer and not stick to a single “template”. Some games may be for individual completion, whereas others may require users to team up with their colleagues. You can also set games over defined periods of time, e.g. to support strategy implementation or business cycles. Playing the games can also happen both in physical and digital environments: some games may require moving about the office or the city, whereas some may be played exclusively in a virtual environment. 

There’s a lot of opportunity in learning games

Overall, game-based learning provides an endless amount of opportunities to engage and activate corporate learners. However, it’s important to keep the learning at the core of the game experience. Thanks to the long history of games, there’s also an endless amount of “features” you can implement in your learning games. So start exploring the mechanics of popular games and get creative on bringing those features into your corporate learning! 

Are you interested in trying game-based learning in your organisation? We can help you get started in activating and engaging your learners. Just contact us

More Learning Ideas

Hyperbolic Discounting – Why Time and Size Matter in Learning

Hyperbolic Discounting in Learning

Hyperbolic Discounting – Why Time and Size Matter in Learning

If you’re involved in the learning and development space, you cannot have missed the trends of gamification and microlearning. As organisations consider implementing these approaches, they are often vary of buying into fading fads – and rightfully so! However, a lot of the new methods and approaches that may come across as gimmicks actually have valid foundations in the science of teaching, pedagogy, as well as educational psychology. To help organisations understand why things like gamification and microlearning work, we decided to open up some of the learning psychology behind each approach. Hence, let’s look at a phenomenon called hyperbolic discounting and it’s effect on learning.

What is hyperbolic discounting in short?

Hyperbolic discounting is a phenomenon initially discovered in behavioural economics and is in fact one of the cornerstones of the field. The prevalent finding and consequence of hyperbolic discounting is people’s preference towards smaller rewards in the near future rather than large rewards in the distant future. Generally, research sees people as present-biased, meaning they are more likely to sacrifice long-term gains in terms of short-term interest.

Now, why does this matter in learning? The two major modern learning approaches basing on this behavioural trait are instant rewarding and microlearning:

1. Hyperbolic discounting explains the success of gamification

The underlying principle of gamification is to provide continuous and relatively high frequency rewards to motivate the learner. Whereas large contexts of learning may seem overwhelming, gamification helps learners to track their own progress in more manageable pieces. With instant rewards, learners always get some kind of “credit” for their participation.

This happens to play perfectly on the psychology of hyperbolic discounting. Rewards are no longer vaguely defined (e.g. this learning helps you in your career path) and difficult to assign a mental value to. Rather, learners know that when they commit to something, they will be instantly rewarded. Naturally, the rewards come in many kinds: badges, points, credits, financial rewards and social recognition just to name a few. The common denominator is that learners can “collect” them instantly.

2. Chunking learning content to cater for the present-biased

Now, it’s likely that gamification is not suitable for everything. Yet, the psychology of hyperbolic discounting and its effect on learning remains. The structure of learning content is a major factor in catering to the phenomenon. Whereas gamification tends to cater to extrinsic factors, you can use a bite-sized learning content structure to cater to the intrinsic aspects of learning motivation.

For instance, you may have a course you require your employees to take. However, as a whole, the course might seem overwhelming with its length. Learners procrastinate and delay uptake due to the high time investment required and rewards being outside of their immediate horizon. To overcome the problem, you should try chunking the content into manageable pieces. The approach of chunking content overlaps a lot with the concept of microlearning. Overall, the approach helps your learners to manage their own targets better. Doing a small task for a few minutes feels a lot easier. Consequently, this could increase your learning uptake and time-to-competency, as learners are engaging more consistently and frequently.

If you have challenges in your digital learning engagement and participation, we may be able to help. The help can be in the form of consulting on learning design or hands-on content development. Just contact us here to discuss your challenges. 

More Learning Ideas

5 Ideas for Leveraging Intrinsic Learning Motivation

Intrinsic Learning Motivation

Intrinsic Learning Motivation & 5 Ideas for Leveraging It in Digital Learning

When it comes to corporate learning, motivation is a tricky subject. As we know, motivation comes in two kinds – extrinsic and intrinsic. Learning itself is arguably an area where intrinsic motivation is prevalent. People find meaning in developing themselves and acquiring new skills. However, statistics of corporate learning don’t always support this line of thought. Motivating learners seems to be difficult, and consequently many organisations have adopted maybe an unnecessarily large focus on factors of extrinsic motivation – rewarding and punishing for success or failure in learning activities. However, as learning in its natural state is one of the most psychologically rewarding feelings, it might be good to step back slightly and consider what you can do to leverage your employees’ intrinsic learning motivation.

1. Shift control to the learner to develop a sense of responsibility

As it is, corporate learning tends be a very top-down exercise. From the learners’ point of view, it may seem that their professional and career development is dictated by someone with limited exposure and oversight to their actual needs and responsibilities. Does it have to be that way? Not necessarily. Let the employees have more control over their own learning. Let them make choices on what, how and when to learn. When you give freedom of choice, you’ll evoke a natural sense of responsibility, which goes a long way to to secure intrinsic learning motivation. To take the idea one step further, you could also enable the sharing of user-generated learning content.

2.  Ensure learning content is relevant and applicable

A major hurdle in learning engagement is that employees don’t see the content as relevant. Often, the organisations may have themselves to blame for over-reliance on one-size-fits-all and off-the-shelf programs. If the content moves on an abstract level, learners are more likely to have a hard time identifying ways to implement it in their daily jobs. Thus, it’s vitally important to spare some thought on the real-life applications of the given learning. For practical skills, tools like learning simulations provide a great medium of linking the training with the daily jobs.

3. Give constant and constructive feedback

Giving learning feedback also goes a long way for intrinsic learning motivation. With proper feedback, learners can enjoy a sense of accomplishment. Furthermore, it helps them to understand when they’ve made mistakes and how to improve on them. Try to avoid negativity and bestowing a sense of failure upon the learners and remember to level the feedback with the complexity of content.

4. Encourage collaboration and sharing for intrinsic learning motivation

Learning doesn’t, and probably shouldn’t, be an individual effort. From a motivational standpoint, the feeling of contributing to a larger social context, i.e. social presence is powerful. Whereas the shift in control is likely to help learners develop a sense of personal responsibility, this helps them to develop a shared responsibility. You can use both collaborative and competitive elements to achieve the goal. Collaborative learning activities help to engage through social commitment, whereas different gamification techniques can help to foster friendly competition.

5. Personalise learning experiences

Finally, personalisation is yet another powerful tool in sustaining intrinsic learning motivation. The “difficulty” of content comes across as one of the most important factors. If the learning content difficulty completely matches the employees’ current skill level, they are not likely to engage deeply. Instead, you’ll want to give your learners a challenge which they can overcome to get the sense of accomplishment fuelling the intrinsic motivation. To provide a diverse group of learners with the content of the right difficulty, you may consider an adaptive learning design method.

Are you having trouble motivating your learners? We can help by auditing your learning content and delivery and provide tailored suggestions on improving both. Just contact us

 

More Learning Ideas

Explainer Animations for Learning – Engage with Visuals

Explainer Animations for Learning

Explainer Animations for Learning – Engaging with Visuals

The preferred ways of presenting information have become increasingly multi-faceted over the last few years. In the digital and mobile era, conventional information format like documents, slide decks and presentations have lost their way. Information today has to be quick and convenient to access, as well as increasingly visual. Visualised information – especially in the format of videos – provides learners a convenient medium getting to the right facts and figures at the point of need. It’s also helpful for opening up different concepts and frameworks. Hence, we’ll look at a few examples and use cases for explainer animations in learning.

What can you use explainer animations for in learning?

In general, we consider explainer animations to work well conveying the following kinds of information:

  1. Numerical information
  2. Statistics
  3. Business Cases
  4. Persuasive Messages

To better illustrate things, take a look at this sample of an explainer animation explaining the concept of flipped learning.

Why do explainer animations make a difference?

As we are constantly fighting for our learners’ attention, video-based content generally provides a good alternative for increased engagement. Furthermore, using explainer animations or videos helps you to focus on the key messages, stripping away unnecessary information and all the “nice-to-know”. This helps to avoid cognitive overload on the learners’ part, which in turn increases learning retention. Furthermore, you are also engaging two new groups of people with spatial/visual and aural/musical learning styles. Overall, the time required to build animations such as this one is not that huge, hence justifying the investment. In terms of software needed, Vyond provides a great tool for creating all types of animations.

If you need help in delivering better learning with explainer animations and videos, we can help. Just contact us. Furthermore, if you’d like to create your own, take a look at Vyond

More Learning Ideas

Leveraging Learning Content Analytics for Better Learning Experiences

Learning content analytics cover

Leveraging Learning Content Analytics for Better Learning Experiences

 

We published this article first on eLearning Industry, the largest online community of eLearning professionals. You may find the original article here

An area where Learning and Development professionals could learn a lot from, e.g. marketing experts, is content analytics. Whereas marketing has embraced the need to constantly iterate and redevelop content based on real-time campaign analytics, learning professionals tend to take the easier route. Once an eLearning activity is produced and published, it’s easy to just leave it there and be done with it. But the work is really only at its midway. How do you find out if the content resonated with the audience or not? If it didn’t, how do you figure out what are the problem areas with the content? This is where learning content analytics come in handy.

Example Of Learning Content Analytics On A Training Video

When analysing the effectiveness of eLearning content, you should pay attention to what kind of metrics you are tracking. For instance, in the case of a training video, traditional metrics like how many times the video was opened don’t necessarily carry a lot of value. Instead, we should be looking at the content consumption behaviour on a wider scale, throughout the content and the learning journey. Let’s take a look at an analytical view of a training video.

Learning content analytics on training video
With learning content analytics, you can easily capture where your learners lose interest and drop off.

In this example, you can see the users’ behaviour at various stages of the training video. As usual, you see a slump immediately in the beginning, followed by another bigger slump later on. We’ve coloured the 2 main points of interest to break them down.

1. Initial Attrition

You are always bound to lose some learners in the beginning due to a plethora of reasons. However, if you constantly see big drops starting from 0 seconds, you might want to double-check, e.g. the loading times of the content, to make sure your learners are not quitting because of inability to access the material in a timely manner.

2. Learning Content Engagement Failure

Going further in the video, we see another big slump where we lose around 40% of the remaining learners in just 30 seconds. Clearly, this represents a learning engagement failure. Something is not right there. Learners are likely dropping off because the content is not engaging, relevant or presented in an appealing way.

How Should I Incorporate Content Analytics In The eLearning Development Process?

The above-mentioned video analytics is just a single example of how you can use content analytics to support your learning. Ideally, you should be running these kind of analytics across all your learning content. xAPI tracking capabilities give a lot of possibilities in this regard. Once you’re collecting the data and running the analytics, this is how you could build the use of analytics into your eLearning development process:

  1. Develop an initial version of eLearning materials
  2. Roll it out to a test group of learners, monitor the analytics
  3. Identify potential learning engagement failures and re-iterate content accordingly
  4. Mass roll-out to a wider audience
  5. Revisit the content analytics at regular milestones (e.g. when a new group of learners is assigned the content) to ensure continued relevance and engagement

This type of approach helps to ensure that the learning activities you provide and invest money in, perform at their best at all times.

How Can I Use Learning Content Analytics To Provide Better Learning Experiences?

By now, you’ve surely developed many use cases for content analytics. To summarise, here’s how you could provide a better learning experience through data-driven insights:

1. Identify The Types Of Content Your Learners Like

In the case of videos, you could benchmark the performance of different types of videos (e.g. talking heads, animations, storytelling videos) against each other and see what type of content keeps your learners engaged the best.

2. Develop Engaging Content

With the power of analytics, you’ll be able to develop better learning. You are able to find out immediately what works and what doesn’t. No need to run extensive surveys. The behavior of the learners is the best feedback.

3. Personalise Learning Experiences

You can naturally run analytics for individuals and defined groups, in addition to the whole mass of learners. This helps you personalise the learning experiences according to e.g. skill levels, seniority, experience, previous learning history, etc.

All in all, learning content analytics provide a powerful tool for increased transparency and visibility into the performance of your eLearning. As learning moves to more in-demand and just-in-time, they help to ensure that you’re delivering the right content to the right audience.

Are you interested in developing more analytical, data-driven approaches to your L&D? Or want to know more about different content analytics possibilities? Just drop us a note, and we’ll get back to you. 

More Learning Ideas

Social Presence – Key to Impactful Learning Experiences

Social Presence in Learning Experiences

Social Presence – Key to Impactful Learning Experiences

Fundamentally, learning is a social process. There’s no dispute that our social context; interactions, engagements and relationships all play a role in shaping our knowledge, skills and capability. Thus,  it’s vital for learning professionals to understand the value of social presence. Social presence, simply defined, is the feeling of being part of something. It seems that this social presence is why face-to-face training is still relevant. People come to the classrooms not only to gain knowledge, but to interact, form connections and engage in social activity.

The failure to replicate this type of environment may have been the reason why traditional eLearning never became the success it was set out to be. However, technology has evolved tremendously from the days of that type of eLearning. Hence, we nowadays have the capabilities of nurturing that social presence even with digital tools. And here are some considerations to help you along the way.

Building Connections and Facilitating Interactions

To attract learners to your digital learning experiences, you need to make sure they have the same possibilities of connecting with people than in face-to-face. Facilitating learning through a social platform helps tremendously in this regard. People can build their connections, engage in discussions and share experiences. People don’t only learn through the materials or the instructor, but from each other also, which the peer-to-peer connecting opportunities facilitate.

Interactions also play an important part in learning engagement. When you are physically disconnected from other learners, it’s vital to have opportunities for interacting in different ways. Enabling people to build profiles, like, comment, share and follow – all fundamental concepts of social media – helps to nurture the social presence and keep learners engaged.

Build on experiences encouraging reflection

Naturally, all learners are individuals and thus have their own individual context – prior experience, background, exposure etc. It’s important to build on these individual experiences, which is one of the primary ways of adult learning. Reflection is of equal importance, enabling the learner to link new knowledge in to previous experiences and form the understanding required for application. Finally, even individual experiences and reflections are powerful when shared with others, as we also learn by mimicking and mirroring. Thus, enabling social presence is important and you should make it possible even across activities that may feel “individual”.

Leverage on groups for learning ownership and support

Social presence can also be an important tool for motivation. When people are actively engaged in a learning group, they are more likely to take ownership of their learning. This means that they are more likely to seek out learning opportunities based on their personal needs e.g. to better participate in discussions. Due to the collaborative nature of learning, individuals are also less likely to drop out of the activities. There’s a sense of commitment to the group and no-one wants to let their peers down!

These type of engaged communities also go a long way in internal support. Whenever someone is struggling, it’s easy to approach people for help. Furthermore, in an engaged community, people often proactively identify opportunities in helping other people. This creates a great platform for both emotional and performance support, which can reduce the L&D department’s work quite drastically.

These are a few ways of leveraging on the power of social presence in your digital learning. If you’d like to learn more or need tools for facilitating social presence in the digital era, just contact us

More Learning Ideas

5 Quick Tips on Giving Learning Feedback

Learning Feedback

5 Quick Tips on Giving Effective Learning Feedback

Feedback is an integral part of any learning process, whether instructor-led or self-paced. With effective learning feedback, you can increase engagement, motivation and growth in your learners. With the plethora of digital tools available today for seamlessly giving feedback, there’s no excuse in doing so. Furthermore, feedback is not difficult to incorporate into eLearning courses either. Most of the content authoring software come with easy tools for feedback. Also, modern digital learning environments increasingly support creative ways of feedback, such as gamification. However, even with all these tools, it’s important to remember what constitutes good learning feedback. Here are 5 quick tips on it.

1. Feedback needs to be continuous, but not interfering

Ideally, every learning activity, whether a video, storyboard or a classroom session, should have feedback. Continuity in giving learning feedback helps to guide the learning process. However, you should give feedback at natural milestones, such as the end of an activity. If you start giving out feedback midway, you have a risk of interfering with the learning flow of the employee.

2. Learning feedback must be about the activity and performance

Naturally, when giving feedback, you should focus on the activity and performance, not the learner as an individual. This is more of a problem in instructor-led sessions, where instructor may fall subject to attribution bias. Understand that everyone can improve through effort, and performance improvement is the thing that matters.

3. Use Effort Praise in your learning feedback

Effort praise vs. intelligence praise is a Growth Mindset concept. By verbally structuring your feedback for effort (e.g. “You worked hard, but it wasn’t quite enough yet. Could you find another way to do this?”) instead of intelligence (e.g. “Perfect. You’re are the best in the group”), you are developing a mindset that embraces challenges and risk and is creative and innovative.

4. Provide reasoning and guidance, not only scoring

When designing learning feedback loops, it’s important to explain the reasoning for a particular type of feedback. Instead of just telling the learner whether they got it right or not, explain why. Why was the answer wrong? Why was the solution to the problem not appropriate? In fact, it’s often good to explain even why the answer was right! From the reasoning, you can also move forward to guiding the learners to try again with a different approach.

5. Embrace making mistakes

Another concept from the realms of developing a growth mindset and learning feedback, embracing mistakes, is important. Mistakes are a natural phenomena and we learn through them. Hence, you shouldn’t punish your learners for making mistakes. Learning activities should be the de facto risk-free platform where they can make those mistakes. Furthermore, you may consider that others in the organisation may learn from someone else’s mistakes too – so share them!

Are you supporting your learners through adequate feedback in classroom sessions as well as eLearning? If you need help getting started, just drop us a note

More Learning Ideas

Learning Digitalisation – 5 Common Pitfalls to Avoid

Learning Digitalisation

Learning Digitalisation – 5 Common Pitfalls to Avoid

More and more organisations are currently undergoing a digital transformation process for L&D or looking to digitalise their learning activities. Whether the desired outcome will be fully digital or blended learning, companies should keep in mind a number of things. As with any change, good planning and strategy makes or breaks the initiative. We decided to help you in crafting the optimal strategy for digital learning. Hence, here are 5 common pitfalls to avoid with learning digitalisation.

1. Not re-engineering learning content for digital delivery

One of the first things where organisations try to cut corners is learning content. “Powerpoints, PDFs and text based manuals have worked for a long time. Why don’t we just upload them to the learning system?” Absolutely not. These mediums may work with active facilitation in a classroom setting, but they are just abysmal for digital delivery. A lot of it doesn’t scale to different screen sizes, and none of it has any interactivity. Digital learning cannot be passive, otherwise you’ll lose out a lot on effectiveness. The 21st century content needs to be full of two-way interactivity and use mediums like animations, simulations and video.

There are no fast wins here. Interactive content development does take time. But good strategic planning will get you started on the right track. And of course there are vendors you can engage as well.

2. Restricting accessibility with archaic platforms

In 2018, the world is mobile and so is our learning. Your employees want to learn anytime, anywhere, using the short segments of downtime they have during their days. However, even a fluid mobile learning experience is not enough. Nowadays learning environments need to work coherently and in-sync across all devices and platforms. Thus, an employee could e.g. start a course at office on his desktop, continue with mobile while commuting and finish off by watching videos on a TV at home.

Mobile and cross-platform functionality is an absolute necessity today. The good news is, thanks to mobile becoming a commodity, these types of platforms can be had at competitive prices! Thus, even small organisations can feasibly look into learning digitalisation without breaking the bank.

3. Neglecting the value of data and learning analytics

Learning data collection and learning analytics will be two of the biggest things impacting L&D for the foreseeable future. Thus one of the most important questions to answer is how do we measure learning in the future?  One of the most important data specifications for the future of learning is the Experience API (xAPI). We strongly advise against committing to any learning platforms or content tools that do not support xAPI. (You may read more on the importance of xAPI here.)

Unfortunately, the way things work is that if a system is not originally built to collect or handle certain types of data, it may become virtually impossible to do so afterwards. Thus, it’s of utmost importance to do proper due diligence on the existing data capabilities and specifications.

4. Neglecting Learner User Experience

As mentioned, data capabilities are of utmost importance in learning digitalisation. However, the learning user experience is equally important. A great looking platform is not enough by itself. Engaging and interactive content is not enough by itself. Both of the aforementioned are not enough if you’re not providing true accessibility and freedom of learning. Therefore, it’s important to study and understand your learners – what are their preferences and how should their whole learning journey be facilitated as seamlessly as possible. The technologies, learning culture and practices need to be aligned.

5. “Black and White” mindset in learning digitalisation

Many companies, vendors especially, claim that learning digitalisation solves all L&D problems of the future. But of course it doesn’t. On the other hand, many trainers believe that you simply cannot facilitate certain topics digitally. History has proven both wrong many times. Hence, it’s important to understand the place, meaning and value of digital in the context of the whole L&D strategy. Furthermore, you should be liberal to experiment with different topics and different types of delivery. A carefully crafted blended learning approach can work wonders, using digital to support face-to-face and vice versa. Thus, it’s important to examine your training needs, experiment, and figure out what kind of solutions you can come up for individual topics.

Are you looking to digitalise your learning activities? If you need help with understanding systems and technology or producing engaging and interactive learning content, we are happy to help. Just contact us

More Learning Ideas