How to Optimise Learning Experiences? 3 Advanced Methods

How to optimise learning experiences cover

How to Optimise Learning Experiences? 3 Advanced Methods

Good and effective learning is not just about the content. Rather, it’s the sum of content, user experience and fit-to-purpose that defines the success of a learning experience. Nowadays, as we develop digital learning experiences, we need to pay increasing attention to how everything works. Frankly, there’s a lot of factors to take into consideration. Luckily, the prevalence of digital and web-based tools brings us the capability to optimise learning like never before. Therefore, we summed up three different methods for optimising learning experiences.

1. Using A/B testing to discover the best design or content

If you’ve ever done digital marketing, or UX design, you’re probably familiar with A/B testing. The underlying idea of A/B testing is to try out two versions of a piece of content or design, and measure the response. To optimise a learning experience, we could for instance measure:

  • Whether a text element or video conveys the required information faster
  • Which typeface/colour scheme/structure creates the most positive response
  • Task performance after using immersive simulations vs. a conventional e-learning module
  • Ease of use of navigation and user flow between two different design versions

By comparing different options with each other in live use, we can get a lot of data. This enables us to optimise the learning experience and get a little closer to the best solution. However, while A/B testing is a good tool, use it wisely. You should always make sure you’re only testing one variable at a time. Otherwise, you can’t be certain of the contributing factors.

2. Using web analytics to optimise the learning experience

Just like with A/B testing, if you’ve been involved with marketing, you’re likely familiar with web analytics. Nowadays, as a lot of the learning platforms out there are in fact “websites”, we can leverage web analytics to understand how a particular platform is being used.

The most famous web analytics tool is probably Google Analytics. But it’s not really about the tool itself, but rather how to use the data it collects. Some traditional web analytics data that can be used to optimise learning experiences include:

  • Device information. How many of the learners are using mobile? What about tablets? Desktop?
  • Bounce rates. How many learners don’t go beyond the first page? Where do they exit?
  • Time of usage. When are learners engaging on the platform? Are they learning during the workday or on their free time?
  • Frequency. How many times have your learners visited your platform? Are they coming back?

All of these data points, and many more, help us to further optimise the learning experience. While these types of web analytics are handy, you may also consider xAPI compatible platforms and analytics. The advantage of xAPI is that whereas e.g. Google’s data is largely anonymised, xAPI lets you drill down to the level of individual learners, and all their interactions within the platform.

3. Using heatmaps and user recordings to understand the flow of the learning experience

A handy new tool in the analytics space is the “heatmap”. While these tools collect largely similar type of data to web analytics, they go slightly further. With these types of heatmaps and user recordings, we can find out for instance:

  • The scrolling behaviour of our learners
  • Mouse movements / taps / clicks
  • The “flow” within the page or learning activity

This type of information helps us to further address problem areas, as we’ll know exactly where the learners tend to pause (perhaps there’s an unclear explanation?), where they progress to (does it happen linearly or as intended?) and how they flow through the activity. For instance, you might find out that only 25% of the learners reach the piece of content you spent a lot of time on. In such case, you might want to rework the activity.

Final words

Learning design as a process is becoming much more agile. We can no longer justify developing large amounts of content or designing in a specific way without validating the assumptions with data. By working to optimise learning experiences, we ensure that learners receive the right resources in the right way, which greatly contributes to their learning success. While the above are great methods and tools for optimisation, you can do quite well even with more traditional means, e.g. surveys or focus groups. In the end, it’s all about getting the right data and letting it guide your decisions.

If you’d like to explore more agile or learner-centric ways of designing workplace learning, feel free to drop us a note. Let’s optimise your learning experiences together!

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3 Quick Tips on Facilitating Discovery Learning

Discovery learning tips

3 Quick Tips on Facilitating Discovery Learning

Professional learning is more important than ever, thanks to the speed of change in the business environment. However, simple delivery and recall of facts and information is not enough. Rather, it’s how we and our employees use information to solve problems within our environment that matters. To encourage a more problem-solving approach to professional L&D, discovery learning might be worth looking into. Here are 3 quick tips on how to incorporate discovery-based elements in your learning design.

1. Steer away from the mundane multiple choice assessment

Most of traditional eLearning is the same. You start with a deck of material and end with a multiple choice quiz meant to test your learning. While a battery of multiple choice questions doesn’t actually even fill that purpose, and you should consider more formative assessment methods, organisations use them as they are the cheapest evaluation method. For learning purposes, a simple change to a discovery learning approach, e.g. open-ended questions can go a long way. Instead of spoon-feeding information and asking mundane questions just for the sake of asking them, use that time wisely. Open-ended questions activate thinking and self-reflection. Furthermore, solving something oneself leaves a more lasting memory trace than simply ‘choosing the right answer’.

You can also add some flavour into these types of questions by introducing social elements and turning the thing into a discussion. Social tools are also beneficial in bringing out those real-world experiences, which further facilitates cognitive processes and assigning meaning to the content. And don’t worry, as an evaluator, you don’t have to manually read everything either. Rather, some of the more advanced tools out there deploy semantic and keyword analysis to determine the “value” of the answers.

2. Discovery learning is moving from known to the unknown

We all are more comfortable with things we are familiar with. The same goes for learning. When designing learning experiences, you should aim to identify the already familiar concepts and ideas and start with them. From there on, you can then gradually introduce more advanced or difficult topics. Serving a baseline of information before inviting the learners solve problems and practice on their own helps to alleviate some of the pressure. However, it’s important that you always create and maintain a safe environment for the learners to discover, practice and make mistakes.

Technology can also assist in the process. For instance, you can use adaptive learning to offer the right content at the right time (whether in terms of difficulty, etc.). Recommendation engines and platforms using them can also prove handy in making more of the ‘unknown’ available.

3. Creating feedback systems is vital for discovery learning to work

Naturally, discovery learning relies on involvement, engagement and participation. As a method, it’s not nearly as “standardised” as some of the other methods, allowing for people to achieve the desired outcomes in their own personal way. For such a system to work, it’s vital that you create good feedback processes to support the learning experience.

Good methods of integrating continuous feedback can vary depending on the need. For instance, collaborative learning and peer-to-peer activities provide a feedback network without adding to the workload of the L&D team. You should also consider digital coaching and the possibilities it brings for 1-on-1 feedback. If coaching is too resource intensive, instructor-led facilitation might be a good alternative for providing the required support.

All in all, a discovery learning approach not only helps to create a lasting learning impact, but also prepares the learners for the future. In a world where critical thinking, problem solving and creativity are some of the most sought after skills, you’re hitting two birds with one stone! And if you think you need help in future proofing your learning strategy, we’re happy to help and discuss potential methods in more detail. Just contact us here.

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Why You Should Forget Learning Styles

The truth about learning styles

Why You Should Forget Learning Styles

Sometimes the field of education and learning – fuelled by the businesses behind it – may take unwanted turns that end up having long lasting consequences. When it comes to learning as a science, there’s quite a bit of information out there. Most of its good; research- and evidence-based information about learning that we as corporate learning professionals can leverage. However, occasionally you end up with the bad apple. One of the most profound bad apples in the learning space within the past years is the concept of learning styles.

Now we are all familiar with the theorem. People have different preferences for learning (e.g. visual, verbal etc.) and by catering to those, we can improve learning results. Sounds logical doesn’t it? It may, yes. Unfortunately, the idea is totally false (if you don’t take our word for it, here’s a rather recent well-written piece).

Learning styles and preferences have been researched extensively over the past decades. No reputable and well-designed research has been able to prove that there’s a positive correlation between catering to one’s learning style preferences and learning results. In simple terms: “learning styles” don’t work. As a matter of fact, they don’t even exist.

Or actually, they do for some entities, and that’s a problem. Several organisations have adopted the concept of learning styles. They’ve developed big businesses on “assessing your learning style” and then catering to those self-reported preferences. The approach has not been proven to work in a properly designed and repeatable review. Yet, it’s easy to sell and make money with, because we intuitively buy into the idea. It sounds logical, and it also helps to shift the blame to something else (“oh it wasn’t really the right style of learning for me, that’s why it didn’t work…”).

What should organisations do then?

Corporate learning & development is a field that tends to easily pursue fads, as long as they’re presented by a perceived authority. Compared to the education field, there may not be qualified educational and pedagogical experts even working within the function. And if there are, they might have been even taught myths like learning styles as a “truth” over the course of their formal education (e.g. qualification on instructional design or training). Whatever the case, you will be wasting a lot of resources in assessments and design efforts that won’t pay off if you take up on this myth.

Thus, you should be very cautious if you hear someone in your organisation talking about learning styles. Furthermore, hearing that from a vendor or a service provider should be a major red flag. It does strongly indicate that they haven’t really done their research. Or alternatively, they’re knowingly selling falsehoods. If you want to make an impact with your learning, you should focus on evidence-based methods. Looking into cognitive science in learning and its findings on e.g. multi-modality may also prove helpful. But the important thing is to forget the learning styles nonsense right away.

If you’d like to discuss learning strategies with real impact, feel free to contact us. We advise organisations on organisational learning and help to transform L&D into the digital age. You can contact us here.

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4 Tips for Modern Instructional Design

Modern instructional design

4 Tips for Modern Instructional Design

Similar to corporate learning, instructional design (ID) is a field that is undergoing a bit of a transformation. While corporates are shifting their efforts into workflow learning and performance impact, instructional designers will see their roles shift as well. This shift is multi-faceted and will require practitioners to learn new skills, adopt new methods and expand their overall role in the organisation. To provide some guidance, here are 4 tips for modern instructional design that you should look into.

1. There are no more fixed models or approaches

Instructional design is a field full of frameworks and models (e.g. Gagne’s nine stages, ADDIE, etc.). However, it’s the overuse of these types of models and frameworks that has pushed the ID practitioners so far away from the business. The problems are multifaceted. On one hand, these models don’t really work with the speed of the business. On the other hand, they produce very boring and homogeneous type of learning. Design is never absolute, but always relative. Thus, instead of pushing subject matter through different dated models, modern instructional designers should focus on solving the business problems at the speed of the business through iterative development and practical problem solving.

2. Instructional Design’s focus is no longer just on materials

A bad system kills good material – and vice versa. If instructional designers want to produce impactful learning experiences, they can no longer focus on just the material. Even the best and most beautifully designed material will never work if it has to be accessed through a system with bad user experience. Hence, ID practitioners have to start working on a higher level, focusing on the learning experience as a whole. User experience is no longer a nice-to-have, but it’s perhaps the most important thing. Additionally, the profession will likely incorporate more and more elements of service design into its normal workflow.

3. IDs should start with the end in mind, not the design

As important as design is, it should never be the starting point. As corporate learning becomes increasingly performance-focused, the goal of the ID work will be to evoke the needed behavioural change in the organisation, not just convey knowledge. We often see unnecessary complexity just because the designer had discovered “a new cool thing” that they felt compelled to incorporate everywhere. No one today has time for that. To really understand the behaviours in the organisation and how to deliver performance impact, instructional designers will be required to align much more closely within the business. ID practitioners have to be ready to deliver solutions also outside of the traditional scope of their jobs- After all, training is rarely the right answer to a business problem. Perhaps one day the ID team will even share the same KPIs as the operations!

4. Instructional designers need to grasp new tech but not get fixated on it

The technology landscape around instructional design is developing very fast. Over the last decade, we’ve seen tools such as videos, animations, simulations, AR, VR and many more emerge. It’s more important than ever that ID professionals know these tools. These are the mediums your learners have and will get used to as consumers. And you shouldn’t expect them to tone down their expectations for your corporate learning. However, it’s again important not to get carried away with one particular technology. A good example of “getting carried away” would be the slide-based eLearning authoring tools and their prevalence. While they’re good tools, many instructional designers and learning professionals seem to know nothing else. The worrying moment comes when we start measuring learning projects in ‘number of slides’ (oops, that might have already happened…). Once again, it’s thus important to keep the end in mind and select the technology based on that.

Overall, corporate instructional design has to become more integrated with the business – or face extinction. The roles within the function will become broader and perhaps represent more “service design for learning”. On a professional level, there are great opportunities for individuals who get this right. Remember, if you need help in developing these modern instructional design capabilities in your organisation, don’t hesitate to contact us.

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5 Lessons from Cognitive Science for Corporate Learning

Cognitive Science for Corporate Learning

5 Lessons from Cognitive Science for Corporate Learning

Design matters. That’s true for many things, corporate learning being one of them. However, the research foundations of learning design can sometimes seem ambiguous. There’s also a lot of invalid information and “myths” (e.g. “learning styles”) floating around. While there’s a lot of talk about neuroscience, that’s still too new of a field for us to comprehend. Therefore, it might be useful to remind ourselves of the things we already do know. Thus, here are 5 lessons from cognitive science for corporate learning design.

1. Make connections with the learners’ prior experience and knowledge

First of all, it’s important that we enable the brain to form the new connections required for learning. Thus, we should guide the learners into putting the newly learnt into context with what they already know. But it’s also possible to flip that around. With a proper use of learning analytics, we can understand that knowledge and those experiences beforehand, and then design the learning accordingly. These types of personalised learning experiences come naturally with a higher contextual value and effect.

2. Facilitate the whole cycle of learning

The second lesson from cognitive science for corporate learning is that we should always facilitate the full cycle of learning: absorbing information, active testing, reflection and creation. Hence, learning must not be just passive slide decks and multiple choice questions. Rather, we should be encouraging and inviting reflection at all stages. We’d also probably be better off ditching some of the mundane multiple choice trivia questions for something a bit more intellectually stimulating. Finally, we should ensure there are opportunities to ‘create’ and put the newly learnt into practice. With the modern type of learning in the workflow, that already happens more naturally, but not all learning can take place like that.

3. Put your attention on attention

In cognitive science, attention as a cognitive process acts as a prerequisite for everything else. Without attention there can be no perception, learning etc. Thus, it’s important that we gain and hold our learners’ attention, and also help to refocus it where necessary. This is what the discussion about learning engagement is all about. To combat the loss of attention, you should design learning that is interactive and interesting. To achieve that, you could use mediums like animations, interactive videos or simulations and take advantage of methods like storytelling. You should also make sure your learning materials direct the learner adequately on where to focus.

4. Enable social engagement and interaction

However, that one type of engagement is probably not enough. Rather, you should also find ways to incorporate social engagement in your learning design. Discussions, sharing, mimicking and shared experiences are all integral components of the learning process. In a classroom setting, enabling these means shifting the focus from the trainer to the learners. In a digital environment, it means shifting focus from delivered content to co-created information. Overall, there are a lot of tools out there to facilitate this type of interactivity and social presence in learning. Look into it!

5. Engage a maximum number of senses – start with visual

While the notion of learning styles has largely been proven false, there are some things that seem to hold true when it comes to learning design. Research in cognitive science and aligned fields indicates that multi-sensory learning improves efficacy. The more senses you can activate, the better the learning results – roughly speaking. Furthermore, it seems that the visual element is of great significance. Thus, you should look into many more mediums than just conventional classroom instruction or those “eLearning slide decks”. You can start small and gradually make your learning experiences more visual and then go on as far as activating touch and motion with e.g. augmented reality.

Overall, we should pay more attention to cognitive science in corporate learning. By understanding what makes learning work, we already get so much closer to designing great learning experiences. And remember, if you think you might need help in any of this, we’re here for you. Just drop us a note.

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Converting ILT to Digital Learning? Don’t Overlook These 3 Things

Converting ILT to Digital Learning

Converting ILT to Digital Learning? Don’t Overlook These 3 Things

As organisations are increasingly exploring the opportunities of digital learning, the transition process from face-to-face to online becomes an issue that needs to be managed. Thanks to increased efficiency and even efficacy, digital offers a lot that face-to-face. However, you should never blindly digitalise learning experiences without thinking it through. Online learning lends itself to some topics better than others. Furthermore, you should always try to augment learning experiences into workflow, and there’s no one-size-fits-all solution to that. Thus, the digitalisation process should be about finding ways to find meaningful ways of using technology to support learning. That being said, if you’ve gone through the consideration and notice there are instructor-led training (ILT) activities that should be transformed from classroom based to digital, there are a few things to consider. Here are 3 often overlooked considerations when it comes to converting ILT to digital learning.

1. You cannot afford to lose the social context of learning

A major thing that most people don’t seem to realise about converting ILT to digital learning is the social aspect. It’s not just the content or instruction that defined a classroom experience, but it’s the social interaction. People learn from each other, and there’s a lot of value in facilitating discussions and sharing outside of the immediate corporate-defined scope of instruction.

Thus, you should really look into ways of integrating collaborative activities and peer interactions into the digital learning experience. Nowadays, there are a number of good social learning platforms out there that get you quite far. But it’s also about building the content in a way that sparks spur-of-the-moment interactions, discussions and reflection.

2. Don’t forget the instructor either – self-paced is not always the best answer

The other element that many tend to cut right at the start of converting ILT to online learning is the instructor. While self-paced learning is on the rise, and much of workplace learning is experiential, everything shouldn’t be. While you can use gamification to keep your learners engaged, the instructor can still play a big role in that. Even with fully online learning experiences, you can still retain the instructor as a facilitator. The facilitator doesn’t necessarily deal with the content or “present” it in any way, but rather he’s there to spark those discussions and encourage interactions. Furthermore, the facilitator can really focus on helping to solve the individual’s learning challenges and provide learning support.

3. You shouldn’t cut corners and try to just reuse existing materials

Finally, you shouldn’t hope for quick wins by just uploading the existing materials to your online learning platform. When converting ILT to online learning, that simply doesn’t work. ILT materials are often presentations and documents. It shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone that both of these are terrible formats of learning in a digital environment. First of all, the user experience is simply horrible and neither of them work on the mobile. Both require pinching, zooming and often display text sizes that are simply not viable for anything less than a desktop computer. Secondly, these traditional ILT content pieces don’t have any engagement once you remove the instructor. They are just words and pictures, and there’s really nothing interactive about them.

So, instead of trying to reuse your old pieces, you should completely redo the components. Modalities like videos, animations, simulations, games and even simple native text work much better.

By avoiding all these practices and focusing on redefining the learning experience as a whole, you’ll unlock the most value. If you want to deliver great learning experiences, there are no short-cuts or quick wins to be had when converting ILT to digital learning experiences. However, the time and resources will pay themselves back quickly!

If you feel you need help in managing your learning content transformation or creating a strategy for it, feel free to reach out to us. We’re happy to help.

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Online Learning Accessibility – Practical Tips for Inclusivity

Online learning accessibility

Online Learning Accessibility – Practical Tips for Inclusivity

If there’s a single universal fact about learning, it’s that there’s not a one-size fits all approach to it. Learners come in various shapes and sizes, each with different profiles and personal traits. Yet, as learning professionals, we should strive to provide each of them an equal opportunity to learning experiences. We should recognise that people learn differently – to some it may seem more difficult than others – and design learning accordingly. To facilitate that in the digital space, here are a few quick tips on improving your online learning accessibility.

Online Learning Accessibility Guidelines

For starters, for learning professionals who wish to remain inclusive, there are two general frameworks that you should be aware of. The first is the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) which should provide useful even for technology developers. The second important framework is the Universal Design for Learning (UDL). At times, these might feel dated, but there are a lot of good information there. As is common with learning difficulties in general, it’s hard to understand them without practical examples. These frameworks help in that.

For now, let’s focus a bit more on the 3-fold division of the UDL and what it should mean in practice.

Online learning accessibility tip #1: Provide multiple means of representation

Providing multiple means of representation means to give learner different ways of acquiring knowledge and engaging with the learning materials. While nowadays video is one of the more prevalent formats in corporate learning, it may not be suited for everyone. Moreover, whole lot of traditional learning materials come in text format (handbooks, manuals etc.) – again not suitable for everyone. To really provide all your learners with an equal opportunity to succeed, you should strive to provide the resources in as diverse set of formats as possible, e.g. audio, visual, text.

To put online learning accessibility into practice, you might consider the following easy implementations:

  • Providing text transcripts of videos or multimedia
  • Embedding subtitles on videos
  • For long text content, enabling the possibility of listening to an audio version (easy, free and quick to do with text-to-speech tools)

Online learning accessibility tip #2: Provide multiple means of expression

While it’s important to provide equal access to information, it’s equally important to facilitate equal assessment! Wherever there’s learning, there’s usually some type of assessment involved. While in general you should consider more formative assessment methods, these principles apply across the board. Firstly, it’s important to provide varied means of assessment: simple text-based multiple choice questions might be limiting for many. Secondly, it’s important to enable activities different from “final exams” where the learners can use their strengths to demonstrate their learning.

To facilitate online learning accessibility for assessment, here’s a few easy things you can do:

  • Instead of text-based quizzes, incorporate more visual methods like drag-and-drops, flashcards and simulations.
  • Enable users to demonstrate their knowledge in various forms: writing, audio/video recordings or through their daily tasks.
  • Try to provide alternatives to “exam-based” assessment, such as journals, reflections and portfolios.

Online learning accessibility tip #3: Provide multiple means of engagement

While there are countless formats for learning content, engagement isn’t only limited to that. Rather, in terms of accessibility, engagement refers more to the ways of finding, accessing and consuming learning resources. You should promote autonomy and individual choice by letting your audience engage with learning when it best suits them. Group activities can also help to increase engagement. Whichever deliver formats you choose, always strive for high-context and relevant experiences.

Here are a few easy to implement tips on providing multiple means of engagement:

  • Use omnichannel learning to provide a unified experience and increased ease of access across different platforms
  • Use social learning and group activities to build social presence and consequently increase engagement
  • Create a safe learning environment and a modern learning culture where learners don’t fear making mistakes
  • Provide access to instructor even in case of online learning experiences for personalised guidance and assistance

Overall, we should pay much more attention to inclusivity and accessibility in both offline and online learning. Ultimately, it’s really all about finding ways to help our talent reach their full potential the fastest and providing various of ways of getting there.

If you wish to provide better corporate digital learning experiences or need a helping hand in developing or auditing your online learning accessibility, we are happy to give you a hand. Just drop us a note here.

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From Transactions to Learning Journeys – Tips for Great Learning Experiences

Learning journeys - better learning experiences

From Transactions to Learning Journeys – Tips for Great Learning Experiences

While learning happens in many ways, places and times, something we can all agree on that it’s not a singular event. Rather, learning happens over time. However, in the realm of corporate learning, we often resort to one-time events (training session, eLearning course). Employees go through these “transactions” and soon forget most of the learning. In business, time is naturally of the essence and that creates a pressure to get the learning over with fast. After all, when people are learning, they are generally not producing immediate revenue. However, the lack of time should be no excuse to resort to this type of one-off thinking. When putting in a little bit of effort, you can actually provide your employees with much better learning experiences by changing the way you deliver learning and here’s how to do it. Here are tips on going from “learning events” to learning journeys.

Understand your learners’ needs

When designing learning experiences, it’s imperative that you spend time on understanding your audience. Mapping out the learning journey is a good way to get things started. By listing all the various touch points and changing needs, thoughts and feelings of your people, you can get a better understanding on what the optimal set of activities might look like. You can also employ methods such as learner-centric design to ensure personalisation.

Also, you should note that when you run out of content, the learning doesn’t end. A very natural way of reinforcing learning is through performance support: employees consuming job aids and quick knowledge snacks to support their tasks. Thus, you should design the learning journeys with performance support components.

High frequency and high context win

Naturally, the aim of moving to learning journeys is to introduce more frequent touch points. This follows the principles of spaced learning, where increased retention is derived through recurring exposure. As the frequency increases, the bite size must naturally decrease. While learning resources should be concise and to-the-point – just like in microlearning – they should also be of high contextual value. Don’t deliver resources that the learners don’t need, and be careful about it. Use feedback and analytics to help in determining whether you’re delivering the optimal type of resources.

When it comes to technology, mobile learning tends to lend itself quite well for this sort of high frequency, high context delivery. Rather than trying to activate new behaviours, you’re utilising the existing ways of quickly consuming content.

Use data to constantly refine your learning journeys

Finally, a journey-based learning approach really calls for an increased use of data. Since you have vastly more touch points than before, you’ll also be able to collect a lot more learning data. You should use this data to constantly improve the learning experiences. You can analyse what kind of resources or content are working and what are not. Current and future skill gaps become a lot easier to identify as well. Overall, good analytics help you in going back to the first phase – understanding your learners. The better the understanding, the better the learning experiences.

Ultimately, moving from one-off events (transactions) into more comprehensive learning journeys can even help you to save time. With constant, quality exposure you can achieve remarkable improvements in retention and results.

Are you looking to deliver great digital learning experiences but don’t quite know where to start? We can help you in developing a future proof learning strategy. Just start the discussion here.

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Practical Tips for Writing Online Learning Content

Writing online learning content

Practical Tips for Writing Online Learning Content

Studies have found that the ways we consume and read content on our devices is different to our way of reading traditional documents. While we are using more and more interactive formats of learning such as videos, animations and simulations, sometimes text based elements are the best option. While this post focuses on learning content, the same principles apply to all web writing. First, let’s take a quick look at how people engage with online texts and then move to practical tips for writing online learning content.

How do our learners read online text content?

In their study on internet reading habits, Nielsen Norman Group found that people don’t actually read online texts. Rather, they glance and skim through them. When opening online content, such as a website or a learning module, learners first skim through the text quickly and then return to whichever part seems interesting. Thus, it’s highly important that you make your content skimmable and easy to read. Now, here are some tips on how to put that into practice and write good online learning content.

Write better online learning content with these practical tips

Here’s a list of the most important aspects of writing web-based content.

  • Don’t use uppercase in the body of the text, headings or titles. Only very short individual words can be written in all capital letters.
  • Don’t bold, italicise or underline full sentences. You should only use highlighting for individual words and names, as using too much will decrease efficacy.
  • You should always format sub-headings as heading, rather than simply bold them.
  • Always use list elements to write lists, no dashes.
  • Don’t use consecutive 1-3 row paragraphs, but try to combine them into 5-12 row ones.
  • Always align all text and headings to the left. Never justify online texts.
  • Don’t display long URLs, but rather use descriptive links or graphic buttons to direct attention.

If you follow these guidelines for writing online learning content, your content will likely look good on all devices from smartphones to desktop computers. By catering to your learners’ online reading habits, you can help them to digest information better. Furthermore, if you’re writing content and want it to be found easier (for instance, if you’re marketing online learning), these tips will also help you with search engine optimisation (SEO).

If you’re looking to develop online learning materials or find ways to improve both user experience and retention, we are happy to share ideas. Just contact us.

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How to Use Formative Assessment in Corporate Learning?

How to Use Formative Assessment in Corporate Learning

How to Use Formative Assessment in Corporate Learning?

Wherever there’s learning, there should always be assessment. Assessment naturally comes in many types and formats, but generally a good distinction to draw is that between summative assessment and formative assessment.

In simplified terms, summative assessment focuses on trying to gauge the learning outcomes at the end of the learning activity. Students may be compared against each other and the assessment is a “high stakes” one. Formative assessment, on the other hand, attempts to measure learning throughout the learning activities. Formative evaluation can be considered less competitive – as the evaluation is based on criterion – and relatively “low stakes”.

How does formative assessment benefit corporate learning?

In our experience, a lot of corporate learning assessment is summative. L&D practitioners may dread the extra effort or may not even be familiar with formative practices. Furthermore, the prevalent tendency to developed slide-based courses with an exam at the end feeds into this behaviour. While building formative evaluation does require a bit more effort, the benefits tend to far outweigh the time investment.

Here are some of the benefits of formative assessment in corporate learning:

  • Trainers / L&D is able to recognise learning problems and skill gaps more effectively – on both individual and group levels
  • Learners are able to identify their own problem areas, self-correct and monitor their own progress
  • It provides valuable feedback to L&D to improve learning experiences and activities
  • It promotes active learning on the employees’ part
  • The focus shifts from achieving arbitrary outcomes (test scores, tick-box compliance etc.) to the learning process itself

In general, a well thought-out formative assessment approach helps all the stakeholders – trainers, learners and managers alike.

How to use formative assessment in practice?

Now that you’ve considered the benefits, here are some practical and highly manageable ways to improve your assessments.

The tools for formative assessment are plentiful, and the benefits are not limited to just evaluation either. By replacing summative assessment with something like this, you’ll also be creating much more engaging and learner-centric experiences. Furthermore, the approach is more data-driven by nature, helping you to make more informed L&D decisions. So start investing the time into it!

If you need help on designing digitally enabled assessments to support your learning strategy, we are happy to help. Just contact us.

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