How to Move Towards a Resource-based Learning Strategy?

In modern workplace learning, speed and flexibility are more important than ever. Meanwhile, employees expect learning to be more personalised and happen at their terms rather than the corporate’s. Conventional approaches to training, such as lengthy classroom sessions or elearning courses are often ill-suited for the real learning needs of the modern worker. Overall, the highly structured, one-size-fits-all formal training is coming to the end its road. So what does the future hold then? Well, many things, that’s for sure. But one major paradigm shift in the way we view corporate learning is the shift towards resource-based learning strategies. Let’s look at that shift in a bit more detail.

What’s a resource-based learning strategy all about?

So, let’s first tackle what’s changing and the factors driving the change. First of all, workplaces are increasingly performance-focused, and that’s affecting learning as well. The need to prove the benefits for performance has been partly fuelled by L&D’s inability to use data and prove the impact of different learning activities. Secondly, skills and knowledge are changing and expiring faster than ever. The employees naturally need to keep up, but don’t have the luxury of time on their side. Thirdly, we’ve realised that one size doesn’t fit all, we can’t force people to learn and a whole lot of learning is not being applied by the employees. A resource-based learning strategy can help to address all these issues.

Here are a few key shifts in thinking and considerations when moving towards resource-oriented learning.

Focusing on helping the employees to do their jobs better

The ironic thing about conventional corporate learning is that it sometimes actually hinders our employees’ ability to do their jobs. We take them away from their jobs. We have them spend their time on learning things that we think benefit the company. Furthermore, we often get carried away with competencies, curricula and courses. But actually, all that matters is that we help the employees do their jobs better. Hence, instead of inconveniencing them with learning, we should build and curate learning that helps them to carry out specific tasks. These kinds of resources have to naturally be quick to access and consume. Time is money. From a learning standpoint, conveying information that the learner can apply immediately is also of much higher learning value than going through abstract concepts that are quite remote from the job at hand.

Allowing people to direct their own learning

Traditionally, companies manage their training in quite a top-down manner. However, more learner-centric approaches to people development may garner better results. One of the key aspects of a successful resource-based learning strategy is the learners’ ability to influence their own development paths and activities they uptake. Allowing people to choose which learning resources to consume and when (often at the point of need) ensures that the material is always relevant and can often be applied into practice immediately. Moreover, learners have a much higher share of intrinsic motivation, compared to L&D team having to lure them over with “artificial” techniques like gamification.

Arguably, modern employees are quite well aware of the fact that they need to take a proactive stance in their own development. This is evident from the statistics on the free time spent on learning various things. A resource-based learning strategy empowers the employees to take (to an extent) charge of their own development. The responsibility of the organisation is to provide the resource base for it. Well-curated resources help cut through the clutter, and find the “right” content.

Final thoughts

Corporate learning has for a long time over-emphasised formal training. However, as traditional approaches start to fall short, we need to refine our strategies. The general need to shift from courses and curricula to resources seems evident. In fact, leading organisations are already implementing learning initiatives to empower their employees unlike ever before. All in all, the shift in philosophy is a fundamental one. Hopefully, this post provides a baseline of concepts to explore further from. And should you need help in future proofing your organisational learning strategy, we are happy to help. Just contact us here.

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