Rapid Learning Interventions – Removing & Redesigning Process Bottlenecks

As the business and corporate landscape is changing faster than ever, learning and development faces a difficult time. Skills evolve at such a fast pace that predictions into future are no longer meaningful. Business models are also becoming more complex, and employees seem to have much more responsibilities than before. Delivering effective corporate learning to stay on top of the change is not easy. However, organisations could help themselves by trying to eliminate some of the traditional barriers in the learning delivery process. Here are a two common and often major bottlenecks that hinder rapid learning interventions and how to get rid of them.

Rethinking training needs analysis

One of the major bottlenecks in the corporate learning design process is the training needs analysis. The process itself is often too infrequent to respond to rapidly evolving needs. It’s also often reactive, rather than proactive. Finally, the common top-down approach where the L&D department assumes they could even have a chance at grasping the complexity of the roles in their organisation is outright infeasible.

The predicament that learning professionals know best when it comes to training needs analysis is causing more harm than good. In fact, people actually doing the day-to-day jobs often have much better visibility. Thus, learning professionals should leverage that visibility by polling for needs and crowdsourcing ideas. Further, to respond faster and enable rapid learning interventions, organisations need to go real-time. Learning data analytics can provide real-time insights into the skill gaps, competencies and training needs in the organisation. No more guess work and fabricated evaluation intervals, the company can see the learning as it is happening.

Redesigning the learning design process

At it’s current state, the learning design process seems to be a bit broken as well. In our experience, the lead times for developing learning materials can extend to 6 months or even a year for some organisations. A lot of this is attributable to the traditional and tedious development processes of learning. Initially, rapid eLearning tools emerged to combat this problem. However, even they still require quite long lead times. While everyone would like to develop a perfect product, most likely it’s not going to happen. Hence, it probably makes sense enable rapid learning interventions by more agile learning design.

Rather than perfecting and fine tuning the learning product for ages, you should start audience exposure already at the “minimum viable product (MVP)” phase. By involving employees and subject matter experts through a more user-centric design process, you can collect timely feedback and improve gradually. A more collaborative approach has the added benefit of potentially greater impact, as the involvement of the different stakeholders results in more personalised learning.

Actually, does the L&D even need to be the one designing content?

There are two things we’ve noticed with the emergence of the online economy. One, anyone can create content for global audiences. Two, there are endless amounts of content publicly available on the internet. Wouldn’t it make sense to leverage these?

How about enabling rapid learning interventions by flipping the paradigm altogether? Since your employees are the best subject matter experts anyway, why not have them create learning content for each other? Or how about leveraging what’s already out there and replacing time-consuming design with learning content curation? There are a lot of tools out there to power up these types of approaches and further customise learning. Here’s an example for curating interactive microlearning videos.

Does your organisation face challenges in deploying rapid learning interventions and responding to business needs? We may be able to help. Just drop us a note here.

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