5 Tips for Better Learning Interactions

To guarantee best results in learning, often an approach prompting learners to become active participants is the most successful one. For digital learning purposes, this means that we need to design interactive learning experiences. However, many organisations seemingly struggle with the concept of interactivity and its actual utility in a learning setting. Thus, here are five tips for designing better learning interactions.

1. Understand the different levels of learning interactions

As we’ve explained before, learning interactions come in mainly three different types. Most of the traditional eLearning tends to focus on learner-content interactivity. However, interactions between learners themselves and between learners and instructors are equally important. Unfortunately, these are often disregarded by corporate learning professionals, who pay too much focus on the information itself.

2. Understand different types of learning interactions

Naturally, there are a more tools of learning interactions than you could count. While you might not need all of them, it’s good to know enough of them to ensure your learning materials don’t turn out monotonous. For learner-content interactions you might use micro-quizzes, knowledge checks, interactive videos, simulations and many others. For learner-learner interactions, you may consider discussions, social media features, peer evaluation and collaborative learning activities. Finally, for learner-instructor interactions you should look into the ways learners can benefit from support, feedback or virtual facilitation.

3. Always use a mix of different learning interactions

Like with many other things, doing the same thing over and over again quickly becomes tedious and boring. The same applies to learning interactions as well. So even though you might have just developed an awesome interaction with your rapid eLearning tools, don’t get too satisfied. Rather, look into several different types of interactions working on preferably all the three different levels. Adequate variation helps to retain learners’ interest.

4. Make sure your learning interactions serve their actual purpose

A common mishap with instructional designers is to forget why we are building interactive learning in the first place. Rather than building learning interactions just for the sake of interactivity, we should pay more attention in how they help the learners to achieve their goals and assimilate information better. If using a simulation requires so much instruction that it takes away from the time spent on the actual content itself, the interaction doesn’t really serve a purpose. Likewise, if your game-based learning elements become too much about the game with vague correlation with learning, you might not be doing the right way. Thus, you should always evaluate your designs by asking “how and why does this interaction help the learner to achieve his goals?”

5. Overkill is never a good idea

In addition to the purposefulness, it’s good to understand that quality doesn’t defeat quality. Filling your content with learning interactions to the brim is not a good idea. Rather, you should use them to pace the learning at proper intervals. Often, low interactivity things like reading, glancing and viewing should still constitute the major part of the learning activity. Interactions should then be used to highlight the core focus areas and ensure the retention of them. Once more, less can be more.

Are you using learning interactions in a smart way? If you feel like you or your learning team could use help building a playbook for learning interactivity, we’d be happy to assist you. Just contact us.

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