Knowledge Assessment in Corporate Learning – 5 Methods

Whenever we do training, it’s generally a good idea to include some kind of assessment. As organisations, proper knowledge assessment enables us to track employee development and conduct analysis on instructional efficacy. While it’s important to go beyond this level of assessment to capture real organisational impact, it’s vital to get the basics right. A challenge in corporate learning is that the evaluation is often too immediate, intimidating and ineffective. Here are 5 methods that not only help in those aspects, but can also make testing more fun!

Continuous assessment with low-key quizzes

One of the challenges of assessment is that it’s often only administered after the fact. However, good evaluation should be continuous. Therefore, instead of saving the quizzes and test until the end of the course or activity, distribute them throughout. This also helps you as the evaluator to spot learning challenges early and intervene accordingly. Furthermore, instead of a daunting battery of never-ending questions, use them in small sets embedded in the content. This makes the whole thing a little more approachable, as the continuous type of questioning feels more like exercises than formal testing.

Constant tracking of activities

Another less quizzing-focused way of knowledge assessment is seamless tracking. The idea is to use comprehensive data collection tools, such as xAPI, to continuously collect engagement data on digital learning experiences. Formal testing is replaced by benchmark measures for user inputs and outputs, that the analytics track learners against. For instance, those who engage with a training video for its full length receive a “higher score” than those who didn’t. Alternatively, those who have made contributions or reflections about the learning on the organisation’s social learning platforms receive higher marks than the rest. These are just a few examples, but the goal is to make evaluation as seamless and automatic as possible.

Scenario-based simulations as knowledge assessment tools

Training simulations are not only good for simulating real life scenarios, they can also be used in highly practice-oriented assessment. This form of evaluation models real life situations and application contexts of the content. Therefore, instead of just answering abstract questions, the learners are able to apply the knowledge in a virtual environment. Depending on the training topic, you can assess multiple variables, e.g. speed, accuracy and confidence. The great thing about these simulations is that they also can make learners more confident in applying the skills on the real job environment, as they’ve got some practice under their belts.

Social analytics for social learners

In case you’ve already implemented social learning tools in your organisation, there’s an interesting alternative to conventional quizzing. Relying on the notion that reflection is one of the most important parts of learning, social analytics can help us to analyse interactions and provide a novel way of knowledge assessment. If you’ve implemented e.g. discussion boards, you could use analytics tools to evaluate learners based on the quantity and quality of discussion they bring in. For instance, simple counters can collect the quantity of comments by a particular learner. Similarly, other algorithms can determine the quality of those comments – whether they contribute to the discussion or not. If you already have a good learning culture, this could present an interesting alternative to some assessment.

Before-, after- and long-after quizzes

Finally, if nothing else, you should at least provide a knowledge assessment opportunity before and after a learning activity. This helps you gain insights into the development that happens. Furthermore, pre-tests can also serve as valuable data sources for instructors and designers, based on which to personalise the learning content. However, an interesting addition would be “long-after quizzes”. The problem with most post-training tests is that they’re too immediate. They tend to capture short term recall rather than real learning. As the forgetting curve tells us, people tend to forget a lot over time. Therefore, introducing quizzes some time after the training can serve a meaningful purpose of capturing the amount of knowledge that really stuck.

Final words

Overall, good assessment is an art form of sorts. There’s no single right answer to what works best. As long as you’re working towards more formative assessment, you’re on the right track. Getting the basics right by asking good eLearning questions also helps a lot. However, this kind of knowledge assessment is only the beginning. We still need to understand how learning translates into action, and how action translates to performance. And it’s the latter two that pose the real challenge in corporate learning. In case you need help solving those challenges, or just in building better corporate learning assessment, we’re happy to help. Just drop us a note here and tell us about your challenge.

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