Learning Nudges as Training Reinforcement Tools

Nudges in Corporate Learning

Learning Nudges as Training Reinforcement Tools

Corporate learning often requires a bit more than just delivering information. It may be hard to get learners to engage, but also to retain knowledge once they’ve “consumed” the learning. However, one of the biggest challenges is in learning transfer: getting the learners to actually change their behaviours. A possible solution to these challenges is learning nudges. Here’s how to start nudging your learners towards better results.

Learning nudges as engagement tools

The first challenge in corporate learning is to get the learners actually engaging in the process. As organisations digitalise their learning programs, we are seeing an increase in self-paced learning. However, that’s often a challenge for engagement, as the responsibility falls on the individual. People forget learning tasks, or might postpone them due to other work. However, nudges are a good way of getting them back to the process. A simple reminder often goes a long way, and it can be in the form of an email, text message or a notification.

However, you shouldn’t spam either. Rather, it’s important to find the right times to nudge people. For instance, the slow period after the lunch break might be an opportunity to get people to activate themselves on some learning. Or slower periods of business activity might provide an opportunity to invest more time into development.

Nudges as learning retention tools

Learning nudges can also serve as retention tools. Just as demonstrated by the forgetting curve, people forget a lot of the learning unless it’s reinforced. Small nudges, whether it’s quick quizzes, bite-sized resources or self-evaluation questionnaires help to reactivate the previously learnt subject matter. By doing that over time, the knowledge transfers from short-term memory to long-term memory. The spaced learning theory can help to determine the optimal intervals for this type of learning reinforcement.

Driving behavioural change with nudges

Finally, one of the biggest challenges in learning is getting people to actually implement new ways of doing. Even if the learning is highly inspirational, and the learners sees the benefit of doing things in a new way, it’s just too easy and comfortable to go back to the “way this has been done”. Thus, behavioural change requires lots of support. We need to remind people, we need to encourage people and we need to collect and deliver feedback. Positive reinforcement and indirect suggestions can have a considerable impact on people’s behaviour. Learning nudges, on the other hand, are the channel for delivering those. Furthermore, you can also deliver performance oriented nudges without too much prior learning. Helpful resources are always welcome. For instance, you could remind people of the behaviours of top performers in the organisation, with the intention that they’d follow suit.

Final words

Learning nudges are a great tool for re-engaging, reinforcing and driving behavioural change. With the mass of communications tools and channels available today, running good nudging campaigns doesn’t require a lot of resources. If you’re using productivity tools or learning systems, it’s also likely that these have features suitable for nudging. The tools are there, it’s just a matter of smart, unobtrusive design. If you need help in designing learning engagement, reinforcement or behavioural change campaigns, feel free to drop us a note, we might be able to help.

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Knowledge Assessment in Corporate Learning – 5 Methods

Knowledge Assessment in Corporate Learning

Knowledge Assessment in Corporate Learning – 5 Methods

Whenever we do training, it’s generally a good idea to include some kind of assessment. As organisations, proper knowledge assessment enables us to track employee development and conduct analysis on instructional efficacy. While it’s important to go beyond this level of assessment to capture real organisational impact, it’s vital to get the basics right. A challenge in corporate learning is that the evaluation is often too immediate, intimidating and ineffective. Here are 5 methods that not only help in those aspects, but can also make testing more fun!

Continuous assessment with low-key quizzes

One of the challenges of assessment is that it’s often only administered after the fact. However, good evaluation should be continuous. Therefore, instead of saving the quizzes and test until the end of the course or activity, distribute them throughout. This also helps you as the evaluator to spot learning challenges early and intervene accordingly. Furthermore, instead of a daunting battery of never-ending questions, use them in small sets embedded in the content. This makes the whole thing a little more approachable, as the continuous type of questioning feels more like exercises than formal testing.

Constant tracking of activities

Another less quizzing-focused way of knowledge assessment is seamless tracking. The idea is to use comprehensive data collection tools, such as xAPI, to continuously collect engagement data on digital learning experiences. Formal testing is replaced by benchmark measures for user inputs and outputs, that the analytics track learners against. For instance, those who engage with a training video for its full length receive a “higher score” than those who didn’t. Alternatively, those who have made contributions or reflections about the learning on the organisation’s social learning platforms receive higher marks than the rest. These are just a few examples, but the goal is to make evaluation as seamless and automatic as possible.

Scenario-based simulations as knowledge assessment tools

Training simulations are not only good for simulating real life scenarios, they can also be used in highly practice-oriented assessment. This form of evaluation models real life situations and application contexts of the content. Therefore, instead of just answering abstract questions, the learners are able to apply the knowledge in a virtual environment. Depending on the training topic, you can assess multiple variables, e.g. speed, accuracy and confidence. The great thing about these simulations is that they also can make learners more confident in applying the skills on the real job environment, as they’ve got some practice under their belts.

Social analytics for social learners

In case you’ve already implemented social learning tools in your organisation, there’s an interesting alternative to conventional quizzing. Relying on the notion that reflection is one of the most important parts of learning, social analytics can help us to analyse interactions and provide a novel way of knowledge assessment. If you’ve implemented e.g. discussion boards, you could use analytics tools to evaluate learners based on the quantity and quality of discussion they bring in. For instance, simple counters can collect the quantity of comments by a particular learner. Similarly, other algorithms can determine the quality of those comments – whether they contribute to the discussion or not. If you already have a good learning culture, this could present an interesting alternative to some assessment.

Before-, after- and long-after quizzes

Finally, if nothing else, you should at least provide a knowledge assessment opportunity before and after a learning activity. This helps you gain insights into the development that happens. Furthermore, pre-tests can also serve as valuable data sources for instructors and designers, based on which to personalise the learning content. However, an interesting addition would be “long-after quizzes”. The problem with most post-training tests is that they’re too immediate. They tend to capture short term recall rather than real learning. As the forgetting curve tells us, people tend to forget a lot over time. Therefore, introducing quizzes some time after the training can serve a meaningful purpose of capturing the amount of knowledge that really stuck.

Final words

Overall, good assessment is an art form of sorts. There’s no single right answer to what works best. As long as you’re working towards more formative assessment, you’re on the right track. Getting the basics right by asking good eLearning questions also helps a lot. However, this kind of knowledge assessment is only the beginning. We still need to understand how learning translates into action, and how action translates to performance. And it’s the latter two that pose the real challenge in corporate learning. In case you need help solving those challenges, or just in building better corporate learning assessment, we’re happy to help. Just drop us a note here and tell us about your challenge.

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5 Immersive Learning Tools for Corporate Learning

Immersive learning tools

5 Immersive Learning Tools for Corporate Learning

Immersive learning is becoming more popular with organisations of many kinds. On one hand, corporate L&D professionals feel the need to provide more engaging experiences to enhance retention. While there’s a lot of inaccurate information out there, one thing holds true. The more multi-sensory the learning experience, the higher the likelihood of retention. On the other hand, we have realised that there are rarely adequate opportunities to practice new skills in the conventional flow of corporate training. Whereas immersive learning can act solely as a retention catalyst, it can also provide a safe environment to practice. Here are 5 tools for achieving these goals.

1. Game-based learning

In game-based learning, the employee is often put in the middle of it. They might assume the role of a protagonist, and the goal is to proceed on the storyline while completing learning-related tasks. The tasks may be explicit, or learning goals might be designed in without very detailed explanation. Game-based immersive learning elements work the same reasons games work. They provide an immersing experience – usually a storyline – as well as challenges and reward the player as they go through the journey. Corporate learning games can be both long and short, and played individually or in a group, which may add to the experience.

2. 360° Learning Immersions

Similar to games, 360 degree learning immersions put the learner at the centre – quite literally! These 360 experiences are often used when there’s a need for a visual resources and reference. For instance, property security staff may use such simulations as a job aid, or engineer may use them when mapping out the layout of a building. As such, this kind of immersive learning experience provides not only a visual reference, but also spatial. Learners can move through spaces in the simulations, and complete tasks and query extra information as needed.

3. Virtual reality

Arguably, out of all the mediums for immersive learning, virtual reality (VR) has got the most attention in recent years. The level of immersion is on its own level, and as such, there are a lot of applications. There’s potentially great value in training areas that are technical, risky or hazardous. Instead of practising on live equipment, or in live scenarios, learners can master the skills needed in a virtual environment, which greatly reduces risk and operational efficiency for all parties involved. As virtual reality develops, we are getting access to more critical features. For instance, data tracking capabilities are currently being developed, which enables us to analyse the consumptions of these experiences. Furthermore, VR content authoring is also becoming less cost-intensive as stock libraries expand and tools develop.

4. Augmented reality

While VR has been getting the lion’s share of the attention, augmented reality (AR) has flown under the radar. Many initial applications have been using phones as an interface. By engaging with content through your phone camera, you’ve been able to launch AR content. This has been used e.g. in team-building, onboarding and leadership training. However, more is coming. With the advent of commercially feasible AR wearables (e.g. glasses), companies are able to bring performance support to life. Instead of going through static resources, employees can now consume learning materials without disruptions to the workflow. Wearables with voice control enable hands-free operation, and connectivity can even bring experts to analyse a live situation from a remote location. While the learning with these tools is perhaps more on-demand than others, it’s certainly immersive learning.

5. Simulations

Finally, simulations are an immersive learning medium that the industry has used for a long time. Simulations generally follow the structure of a decision tree, or a branching scenario, where each decision determines to direction one will go to next. These experiences put the learner in the driver’s seat, and enable them to practice in a scenario that resembles a real-life encounter. While organisations tend to employ these for customer service, sales and soft skills, they are generally an easy way to provide a safe environment for practice for most non-technical skills.

Final words

Overall, immersive learning tools are a necessary component of a good L&D toolbox. While they likely help to increase retention, they also provide a safe environment for practice. And practice is critical, if you want learning transfer to really happen. The technology in this space is developing rapidly, so expect great things ahead. And if you’d like to bring some immersive learning technologies to your organisation, don’t hesitate to drop us a note. We can help you select the right tools for your problem.

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Learning Technology Integrations – A Quick Guide

Learning Technology Integrations

Learning Technology Integrations – A Quick Guide

Often, a challenge in using information systems in complex organisations is that the systems don’t talk to each other. Information is scattered and outdated, transition between different systems is not easy and it’s hard to get a unified view of what’s going on as data is spread across multiple silos in different formats. Hence, system integrations have become important. As more technologies emerge in L&D, the topic has become important here too. Therefore, we put together a quick guide on the most relevant learning technology integrations you should know. Take a look!

Single Sign-on Integration

Single sign-on (SSO) is a basic learning technology integration but a handy one. With SSO, your users are able to login to the different learning technology systems by using their existing company accounts. For instance, say you have Microsoft accounts that employees use for identifying themselves. Instead of having to remember a new set of login credentials, employees are able to login to other systems with them.

The benefits of SSO integration include user experience and security. Moving between different systems is much easier when you don’t have to login separately. Also, less credentials means more security. Furthermore, as the company controls the original credentials, security interventions can be swift. Also, as soon as an employee’s account gets terminated, they lose access to all the other systems too.

HR system integrations

While you’re using learning technologies, you also most likely have some kind of HR system. Another important learning technology integration happens between that and the learning technologies. The goal of such integration is to update information at both ends automatically. For instance, the learning tool pulls personnel data from the HR system, and assigns the user learning based on that information. Thus, whenever there’s a role change, you don’t need to manually assign new learning tasks. Also, the learning technology tool can push back information to the HR system. For instance, whenever an employee finishes a learning path, the tool sends information to the HR system.

The benefit of this type of learning technology integration is the elimination of manual administrative tasks. There’s no longer a need to retrieve and upload e.g. excel files between different systems. Furthermore, with good initial configuration, employees can e.g. automatically get access to learning resources based on their role, seniority, business unit, geography etc.

LRS Integrations

Learning Records Store (LRS) is a powerful tool based on the xAPI framework. It enables the collection of data from multiple systems under the same roof. For instance, you may have multiple LMS systems that all feed into this same data archive. Or you might feed in face-to-face training records, mobile app and performance support tool data. While it may require data operations, it’s also possible to pull in data from non-learning systems, such as performance management system or that HR system to an LRS.

With this kind of learning technology integration, you can have all your training-related data, and much more, in the same format, in the same location. This makes effective learning analytics a lot easier. Hence, you’ll be able to get a better understanding and bird’s-eye view of what’s happening in the entire organisation. All the LRS tools also become equipped with powerful dashboards and data tools.

Webhook Integrations

Finally, webhooks are a type of integration that can sometimes prove handy. The fundamental idea is that a webhook notifies you when something happens in a system, for which you can then create an automated response. In the context of learning technology integrations, there can be several use cases. For instance, whenever a learner does something in App 1, do something in App 2. Or, as a group of learners have finished a learning experience, send an automatic report to their line manager.

Webhooks are a good way of integrating certain things and automating workflows. When running multiple systems and platforms, it’s easy to get lost in the administrative work. Designing these types of integrations and reactions in a smart way enables you to decrease that workload.

Final words

Overall, the future of learning is integrated. The different tools we use have to talk to each other. Otherwise, it all quickly becomes inefficient and redundant. Learning technology integrations are an important thing to consider whenever bringing new technology into the fold. Good integrations and automation protocols can significantly reduce the administrative workload that goes into managing learning tools or other systems.

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5 Tips for Designing Great Job Aids

Designing Great Job Aids

5 Tips for Designing Great Job Aids

As the 70:20:10 theory implies, a lot of learning in organisations happens outside the boundaries of formal training. While we often cater to the formal side, there’s a lot of other important use cases for learning. With the current speed of change in business, being able to up-skill people ahead of time becomes more unrealistic. Often, we just have to start doing faster, and hope that it goes well. But the inability to train people beforehand doesn’t mean we have to forgo training altogether. Job aids, for instance, are a great way of providing learning resources on the job. Here’s what you should take into account when designing them.

1. Simplify radically

One of the key characteristics of job aids is that employees engage with them within the workflow. To minimise disruptions to that workflow, we need to minimise the time spent querying information. Therefore, similar to the logic of good storytelling, job aids should be as simple as possible. Don’t circle around the topic, but dive right in. This is not a medium to display every single bit of knowledge either, but rather to provide concise information to help the employee with a highly specific task. Everything that goes beyond that or doesn’t support that goal is excess clutter, and should be removed.

While simplifying radically enables employees to find the information faster, it also eliminates the need to spend time on making judgement calls on what information is relevant. Therefore, they’re able to get back to peak performance faster.

2. Avoid excessive use of interactivity

In the general realm of digital learning, we often talk about the importance of interactivity. While interactivity is vital in creating engagement around the learning content, with job aids, it rarely serves a purpose. As the goal is to consume nuggets of information as rapidly as possible, any interactive elements, such as questions sets, exercises and the like just get in the way.

Instead, simplify the content also in this regard. Often the simpler the better. We should always choose content types based on their fit for purpose and ability to convey the information. Videos might be the best options for some material, whereas simple text and images might work for some.

3. Make it searchable

In most cases, these type of performance support resources are accessed via some kind of system. Accessibility is a big consideration in designing effective job aids. You can design great resources, but if we bury them inside a complex, layered LMS system, finding them might become too much of a burden. If we don’t provide employees with a seamless way of making queries and finding the right material from the library, they’ll quickly default back to Google and Youtube.

Therefore, it’s important to first of all make the content searchable. The nature of job aids entails that there’s going to be quite a lot of them. To enable employees to find the relevant stuff fast, you do need a search function. While identifying the right content is important, it might also be beneficial to be able to search for e.g. keywords within a piece of content, to locate the relevant information faster. If you’re doing videos, providing navigation buttons inside the video might make sense.

4. Make the user experience simple

As mentioned, employees often access job aids via a platform, tool or a system of some sorts. Whatever the system is, it’s important that the user experience is fluid, natural and easy to use. The experience must be intuitive, meaning that employees don’t have to spend time on learning how to use the system. The less clutter there is, the better.

Generally, performance support tools or job aid portals contain a much more limited set of features compared to conventional learning tools. If you’re implementing one, it’s a good idea to review out-of-the-box or “popular” features, and consider whether they’re actually necessary for this particular use case.

5. Understand the users’ context

Finally, it’s incredibly important to understand how the employees actually engage with tools like these. Often, but not always, these types of job aids tend to be consumed on the mobile. If that’s the case, you’ll want to focus on that as your primary medium, and employe best practices for mobile learning design. If the use case is more corporate office, you might see more desktop use, and thus have more “real estate” to play with.

Going beyond devices, it’s also important to understand the use situations, i.e. the learning opportunities in the workflow, in more detail. E.g. if employees are using job aid videos on a noisy factory floor, they might not be able to hear the sounds of videos. Thus, it may be necessary to provide subtitles and ensure that the information is conveyed even without narration.

Final words

Across industries, we are seeing a trend of looking beyond the conventional formal training when considering the corporate “learning mix”. Well-designed job aids are a great way of providing performance support and rapid learning within the workflow and on-the-job. Not only does this enable people to maintain better productivity, it may also make sense for learning too, as all learning gets put into practice right away, which tends to increase retention. If you’re looking into job aids, and think you may need help in designing them or implementing proper tools for them, we might be able to help. Just drop us a note here.

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Storytelling in Corporate Learning – 3 Impactful Uses

Storytelling in Corporate Learning

Storytelling in Corporate Learning – 3 Impactful Uses

In a world full of noise, you won’t get yourself heard without a story. Telling stories has become incredibly important. Whereas the world is full of information, facts and data, we can only process a very limited quantity of it. To get ourselves heard, we need to connect emotionally to our audience and present compelling narratives. It’s unlikely that you’ll be able to win people over and evoke change with facts. In the realm of workplace learning, we first need to get people to listen, then to remember, and finally to act. Therefore, we need stories too. Here are three impactful uses for storytelling in corporate learning.

1. Increase the retention of learning content

People don’t really remember facts, but they do remember stories. To understand this, look no further than the award-winning advertisements and campaigns of recent years. Companies have stopped talking about their products and services, or even themselves. Rather, they tell stories about their values and people. And people do end up buying, because they remember those stories.

Storytelling in corporate learning works in a similar fashion. Learning retention is one of the common problems with learning initiatives. We tend to pack our learning content with data and facts, but end up doing a disservice to our learners. Instead, we should focus on telling stories. Stories that portray e.g. our customers, or the people in the organisation. This puts a humanising touch to the learning experience, whether it’s online or offline.

Furthermore, good storytelling practices also force us to focus on what matters. Good stories cannot be packed with information. Every point that is less than 100% relevant to the story dilutes its impact. Therefore, when building stories, the aim is to go as bare-bones as possible, to only include the most relevant facts. From a learning point of view, this helps the learners to get the necessary information quickly and avoid the excess clutter. Often, less is more when it comes to corporate learning.

2. Communicate the ‘why’ of new learning initiatives

The practice of workplace learning is undergoing big shifts. Most companies are looking for ways to digitalise learning and implement new learning technologies in the workplace. With shifts like these, we are often introducing new ways of working and doing things. Yet, we don’t always communicate it very well.

When undergoing digital transformation, most companies tend to focus on the ‘what’ and ‘how’ of the change. What is going the be the new way? How are going to do it? The problem is, that is not interesting, and people won’t listen. Instead, we should put a heavy emphasis on the ‘why’. People may not even agree with the ‘what’ or the ‘how’, but if you’re good in communicating the ‘why’, they are much more likely to rally behind your cause. Connect with the audience, and communicate shared values, and you’ll get them on board. Good storytelling in corporate learning focuses on and starts from the ‘why’.

3. Get people to put knowledge into action

Retention is not the only challenge in corporate learning, perhaps not even the biggest one. In fact, the biggest challenge is often behavioural change. Once we get the knowledge installed in the learners’ minds, the question becomes whether they’ll actually put it into practice. Without adequate support, they statistically won’t, and learning transfer will remain low. Yet, telling stories could help in this regard too.

Good storytelling in corporate learning gets people to put the learnt into practice, to do it. By featuring stories of people who have implemented particular knowledge or skills at their work, we create a path for others to follow. Good stories can be testimonials, but they can also be more concrete, practical how-to examples. Once learners see other people in similar jobs and contexts telling their stories of success, or even failure, they are much more likely to take the leap and do it themselves.

Final words

Telling stories is more and more important, even in corporate learning. It enables us to get people on board, have them listen and remember, as well as put the learnt into practice. A storytelling mindset also helps learning professionals focus on what’s important: communicating ‘why’ and cutting out unnecessary information that would only overload the learners. If you need help in building better storytelling in your corporate learning, we may be able to help. Just drop us a note here.

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Gamified Instructor-led Training – 4 Simple Ideas

Gamified Instructor-led Training Ideas

Gamified Instructor-led Training – 4 Simple ideas

We often see gamification as a tool to enhance online learning, but the potential doesn’t end there. In fact, we can use a lot of the same techniques and methods to engage learners in the classroom too. Whereas very basic gamification elements may be a bit dull, deeper and more advanced things can really take the face-to-face experience to the next level. To enable that, here are 4 simple ideas for gamified instructor-led training. Take a look!

Challenge your learners

Challenges are a great way of gamifying the learning experience. Instead of keeping the session one-sided, have the learners participate actively by prompting them with different tasks. This gets them to apply the things they’ve just learned, increasing learning retention. Challenges can also utilise elements of friendly competition, whether completed in teams or individually. This provides an added level of engagement and excitement.

The advantage of using this type of gamification in instructor-led training comes from the ease of use. Challenges can be set beforehand, reducing the time spent on administering them in the classroom. Similarly, the trainer will receive real time information of the participants’ performance.

Get out of the classroom for more activity

But gamified instructor-led training doesn’t have to stick to the boundaries of the classroom. Getting out of the classroom probably makes things even more active. One good example of that is activities in the form of scavenger hunts. The trainer can create a gameboard for the players to play on, which can be e.g. a live map or a static image of the office premises. Players can hunt down on clues on this map, while completing tasks and challenges as a team or individually. Furthermore, the trainer in charge can monitor each participant’s progress and provide real-time direction and feedback if necessary.

While methods like this tend to be more effective in getting subject matter across, thanks to their active nature, there are other benefits too. For instance, these activities tend to also be great team-building moments, if played as a team.

Real-time exercises

While we discussed different types of challenges, more simpler exercises are also a meaningful way of gamified instructor-led training. And doing that in real-time can be a lot of fun. For instance, trainers can use different tools to ask questions and push exercises, and display people’s answers in real time. This again helps to spark some friendly competition, especially if you’re keeping score.

However, real-time exercises are also helpful to the learners. Learners get instant feedback, and a sense of achievement and progress as they complete exercises correctly. Furthermore, they can monitor their own learning, also in comparison to other people. Thus, they’ll be able to notice early on if they are not keeping up.

Accelerated feedback cycles and instant rewards

Finally, while not a specific technique, it’s important to talk about the importance of rapid feedback. Like mentioned above, the accelerated feedback cycles that gamified instructor-led training tends to bring along benefit all parties involved. This can also improve the quality of feedback. As trainers push exercises through the participants’ mobile devices, they get all the information in real-time. Thus, the trainers are able to provide more to-the-point and personalised feedback.

While not monetary, this acts as instant rewards to the learners. Often the fact that one notices progress and keeps is able to overcome challenges is a good source of learning motivation on its own.

Final words

Overall, there’s a lot that you can do when it comes to gamifying the classroom experience. Gamified instructor-led training can ease the cognitive overload, activate the learners, increase engagement and motivate people to continue. While these are just a few methods that one can accomplish with several tools, they do provide a much needed toolbox update for trainers and learning designers. If you’re looking to gamify offline or online learning experiences, drop us a note. We are happy to share some experiences and insights in that space.

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How to Humanise Online Learning?

How to humanise online learning?

How to Humanise Online Learning?

One of the common pain points of digital learning is its passivity. One of the reasons learners often cite for unwillingness to engage is the lack of the human factor. Learning by oneself in an online environment is not necessarily very fun. While techniques like gamification can help to spark interest and keep motivation high, it might not be enough. However, you could tackle a lot of this problematic passivity already at the design phase. By focusing on making learning more active and human, one can go long way. Therefore, here are a few different tips for humanising online learning.

Humanise online learning with peer interactivity

One of the first contributors to the human factor is peer interaction. When digitalising learning, it’s easy to forget to utilise all three levels of interactivity. While peer-to-peer interaction occurs naturally in conventional classroom learning, it doesn’t online unless you create the infrastructure for it. So, when humanising online learning, it’s critical to enable learners to interact with each other.

The interactions can take many formats. Online discussions or internal social media channels are a good way of getting started. Chats and video rooms can also help to connect remote teams and individuals to each other. Whatever the social framework, usually a common rule applies: it’s not easy to get people to interact without any kind of guidance. Therefore, it’s a good idea to prompt and facilitate the discussions, and design them to be a part of the material.

Make it about the people, share stories

Humans are wired to retain, respond and relate to stories. However, training content often tends to stick to the facts and figures. The content moves on an abstract level, often with little explicit relation to the jobs or people in question. This doesn’t do wonders for learning results, nor is it particularly human.

One way of humanising online learning is to shift focus away from the content to stories. Less is more is a good approach when it comes to data and factual information. When you go less on that front, you’ll create room for more storytelling. Now, you can plan the stories meticulously like your marketing department might do. But it could work to also let your people share their stories. A personal testimonial or a story of a use case of the things that is being learnt is likely much more valuable than some facts that end up forgotten anyway.

Experiment with adaptive or personalised learning

Another way of making online learning a more human experience is to personalise it. Personalised learning is about finding out the learner’s interests, needs, requirements and ways to add value, and providing resources catering to them. A one-size fits all passive online learning course is about the least human experience there can be. Personalising the experience, tailoring it to the learner, can take some of that feeling away.

Adaptive learning could also accomplish similar goals. The fundamental idea of adaptive learning is slightly similar to personalisation. The learning content and its sequence doesn’t resemble a linear path, but rather a spider’s web. Based on performance on previous parts and the learners perceived knowledge and skill levels, you direct them to different bits of the material. Similar to before, learners feel that you’ve designed the learning for them, instead of a profile of averages.

Provide comprehensive and rapid support

Finally, there’s often a lot of human touch missing from getting help with one’s learning. In a lot of cases, learners tend to get left alone with the courses and programs they are completing. If they encounter a problem, they are supposed to solve it on their own. If they have questions, they might be able to ask somewhere, but getting a response might take a long time. All of this causes interruptions to the learning process.

Therefore, when humanising online learning, it’s important not to forget the learning support either. Give your learners ways of reaching out to the trainers or admins. Whether it’s usability issues or questions about the content, make it easy to contact the relevant people and ask for help. Having access to a safety network of this kind can help to alleviate a lot of the stigma when it comes to online learning.

Final words

Overall, as organisations make the transition towards online learning, it’s important not to forget the human factor. Passive consumption of online content gets too tedious fast, and learners disengage. Humanising the learning experience can keep them engaged, and feeling that they’re not just the victims of a cost-cutting exercise. Hopefully these tips prove helpful. In case you need help in making online learning more human, feel free to reach out to us. We’d be happy to help.

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Asynchronous Learning at the Workplace – Pros & Cons

Asynchronus Learning at Workplace

Asynchronous Learning at the Workplace – Pros & Cons

As many organisations digitalise their training, they often take the asynchronous route, lifting away the constraints on time and place. In asynchronous learning, learners can progress at their own time and pace. While the approach is efficient, there are still certain limiting factors and problems to solve. Therefore, we put together the pros and cons related to the method.

Asynchronous learning: the pros

Naturally, there’s a lot of upside to the method. If there wasn’t, it wouldn’t probably be as popular. Here are some of the advantages we see in using the time-independent learning method.

Flexibility. The method is highly flexible, enabling learners to engage anytime, anywhere, as long as they have a network connection. This helps tremendously in finding time for learning, as you don’t have to coordinate multiple schedules.

Learner-centred. The method puts the learner at the centre and gives him/her the control. It’s about one’s individual progress and people can go through the content as many times as they feel needed. This may help to balance out differences in learner skill levels as well as learning speeds.

Efficient. Asynchronous learning tends to require significantly less resources than its counterpart. As learners are engaging through digital mediums, they don’t need to travel to come together for a training session. This is especially helpful for organisations with a dispersed workforce.

Potential for personalisation. The method leaves room for a lot of personalisation. While it’s hard to personalise in a classroom, with this method learners can be assigned materials tailored to them. Even adaptive learning is possible, enabling learners to craft their learning journey as they progress through.

Asynchronous learning: the cons

However, there are downsides to this method of learning as well, just like to any other method. Here are a few considerations you should keep in mind when doing asynchronous learning. We’ll also list a few suggestions to tackle them.

Lack of social interaction. Conventionally, one of the big challenges has been the lack of social interaction. Fundamentally, learning is a social process, and eliminating peer-to-peer and instructor interaction may get some learners feeling isolated. However, nowadays more and more social learning platforms are emerging, which may solve some of the problems.

Absence of instant feedback. Another aspect where the asynchronous model may be lacking is feedback. Whereas in classroom a learner would get constant feedback, both direct and indirect, from the instructor and peers, this doesn’t always materialise in digital learning environments. However, the aforementioned social learning tools may help. Also, feedback is question of learning design. It takes a bit of time to design comprehensive flows of instant feedback throughout the material, but it’s well worth the effort!

Requires self-regulated learning skills. One of the primary challenges in asynchronous learning is getting people to commit to learning. Self-paced learning requires motivation and engagement, both of which you will likely need to carefully facilitate. However, a portion of people may not have the capabilities to manage their own learning. Therefore, we should always clearly communicate things like workload required, and offer tips and support to the learners in case they face challenges.

Final thoughts

Overall, asynchronous learning provides great possibilities thanks to its flexibility and efficiency. However, to ensure that everyone has ample opportunities for learning, we should build adequate support frameworks to make sure no-one falls off the bandwagon. Furthermore, if we can find meaningful ways of adding more social interaction, personal touchpoints and incorporate feedback on the programs, we’ll be able to significantly improve the offering. If you need help in improving your own asynchronous learning programs, feel free to drop us a note. We’d be happy to share some experiences.

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4 Active Learning Methods for Corporate Training

Active learning methods in corporate training

4 Active Learning Methods for Corporate Training

Research shows that learning methods in which learners participate and engage with the instruction are more effective. While the learners might think they’re learning more via conventional “lectures”, further research indicates that’s a false assumption. Thus, if you want people to retain the knowledge better, you should utilise active learning methods. While self-paced learning is on the rise, there’s no reason you can’t design more active experiences even in online learning. Here are four proven methods to consider.

Flipped learning

The idea of flipped learning is to ‘flip’ the conventional use of time in training. In short, you do knowledge delivery online, and focus the classroom time on active learning, such as workshops, discussions, group tasks etc. This approach enables the learners to get more hands-on, involved and engaged. Consequently, this helps them to retain the knowledge better. Furthermore, the added practice may lower the barriers to implementing the things on the job.

Learning by teaching others

Another common active learning methods is learning by teaching others. In a corporate environment, you could replicate the idea in multiple ways. For instance, you could use user-generated content as part of your online learning programs, effectively letting the employees provide resources for each other. Additionally, you could let employees produce entire courses on their own. If you don’t want to give up control over content, you could also explore different approaches to peer-to-peer learning or digital coaching, pairing learners with willing “teachers” from within the organisation.

Social learning

One of the most meaningful ways of participation is social. There’s a lot of value in letting learners interact with each other. By enabling social learning elements, you can create powerful experience sharing platforms. It’s often highly beneficial to understand not only the content, but how others view it, and how they have perhaps implemented it in their own work. In fact, some of the best online social learning programs are centred around these types of interactions, not the content. Active learning can take many forms!

Learning simulations

Finally, simulations can be a powerful tool of active learning. Instead of just passively going through the content, learners need to interact with situations representing real-life scenarios. This also goes beyond acquiring conceptual knowledge, as it pushes the learner to apply what he/she has learnt. And more importantly, simulations require the learner to activate. You cannot browse through without really looking into it, you must interact!

Final thoughts

Overall, you should prefer active learning methods over passive ones. Naturally, everything cannot be active, but the notion acts as a good reminder to avoid online learning becoming too stagnant. Even if you don’t have the capabilities to work on any of the methods above, just simple interactive exercises can do the trick. If you need help in designing your online corporate learning to be more active, we are happy to look into it. Just drop us a note here.

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